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ti'S 






THE 
BURI 



[j^"^] 



URY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 




THE 
ASHBURIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAMA 



VOLUME XLVIIl 



1964 



THE ASH B U RI AN 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

RocKCLiFFE Park, Ottawa, Canada 

Visitor 
Field Marshal, the Right Honourable Earl Alexander of Tunis, K.G. 

The Board of Governors 

Ian A. Barclay, Esq - ...Vancouver 

Frank D. Bliss, Esq. .-. .....Hamilton 

S. C. Evans, M .D. ..-. .Ottawa 

Colonel J. D. Fraser, V.D. _ Pembroke 

S. G. Gamble, Esq., B.Eng Ottawa 

Donald Alclnnes, Esq., B.A., LL.B., Q.C Halifax 

J. A. B. AIcLeish, A1.A., Ph.D Ottawa 

J. Campbell Merrett, B.Arch., AI.R.A.I.C, AI.T.P.I.C. Ste. Anne de Bellevue 

A. Perley-Robertson, Esq., B.A. ...Ottawa 

The Right Reverend E. S. Reed, AI.A., D.D., D.C.L ....._ ...Ottawa 

D. Cargill Southam, Esq — Montreal 

Alajor-General H. A. Sparling _ Oakville 

Alajor-General D. C. Spry _ .Ottawa 

E. P. Taylor, Esq., B.A Toronto 

The Honourable Air. Justice A. L. Thurlow Ottawa 

Captain G. A. Woollcombe, CD., R.C.N. (Retired) Montreal 

Executive Committee 

R. E. L. Gill, Esq., Secretary Ottawa 

M. E. Grant, Esq., A.F.C _ Ottawa 

W. A. Grant, Esq. Town of Alount Royal, P.Q. 

G. D. Hughson, Esq., B.ScE., P.Eng _._ Glens Falls, N.Y. 

R. Al. Johnson, Esq., B.Eng., P.Eng., M.E.I.C Ottawa 

A. B. R. Lawrence, Esq., Q.C, MPP Ottawa 

Donald Maclaren, Esq., B.Sc., P.Eng., A^ice-Chairman Buckingham 

D. K. MacTavish, Esq., O.B.E., K.C Ottawa 

E. P. Newcombe, Esq., B.A., Q.C Ottawa 

L. C D. Palmer, Esq Ottawa 

Commodore W. G. Ross, CD., R.C.N. (Retired) Chairman _ Ottawa 

R. W. Southam, Esq., B.A., M.S Ottawa 

S. F. M. Wothcrspoon, Esq., B.A., Q.C Ottawa 



THE AS H B U HI AN 



ASHBURIAN STAFF 



Editors 

Junior Section — L. I. H. Spencer, Esq. 
Senior Section — J. S. Batts, Esq. 



Managing Editors 
L. H. Sibley, Esq. — D. L. Polk, Esq. 



Business Manager 
J. S. Irvin, Esq. 



Photographic Editor 

.M. MoSHER 



Assistant Editors 
G. R. Garpon — D. McGavghey 



THE ASH B U RI AN 



STAFF 

Head?fiaster 

R. H. Perry, B.A., Toronto, iM.A., Columbia 

Assistant Headinaster 

A. D. Brain, B.A., Toronto 

Exeter College, Oxford 

Director of Studies 

L. H. Sibley, B.Sc, ;McGilI 

AI.C.I.C, F.C.S. 

Senior School Housemaster 

J. J. Marland, A.C.P., Dip.Ed., London 

English Teaching Certificate 



R. J. Anderson, 

Army P. T. College 
J. S. Batts, B.A., (Wales) 

Dip.Ed. (University of London) 
R. Bernasconi, 

Swiss Teaching Certificate 

J. L. Bl.ACK, 

B.A., Mount Allison, M.A., Boston 
Mlle M. a. Cordonnier, 

Cambridge Certificate 

Certifiee de I'Universite de Paris 

(Sorbonne) 
H. S. Dalton, 

University of King's College 



SENIOR SCHOOL 

A. J. Hancock, B.Sc, 

Dip.Ed. (University of Nottingham) 
Rev. K. B. Monks, B.Sc., 

Agr., McGill, S.Th., University 

of Toronto 
L C. Pemberton, B.A., 

Bishop's University, Uni\ersity 

of Toronto 

A. H. N. Snelgrove, .Mount Allison, 
Newfoundland Teaching Certificate 

Arnaud de Kerckhove Varent, B.A., 
Brussels, B.Ed., Ottawa 

B. B. Vincent, M.A., 
Oxford and Toronto 



Assistant Senior Housemaster 
Major H. J. Woods, M.B.E. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Master ifi Charge 

D. L. Polk, B.A., Dartmouth 

Assistant 

L. I. H. Spencer, B.A., Sydney, Australia 

State Teacher's Certificate (Hon.), \'ictoria 



Rev. E. C. Attwell, B.A., 

Western, L.Th., Huron 
Miss W. G. Black, 

University of Toronto 
Mrs. H. S. Dalton, 

University of Toronto 
B. K. Hillary, 

Springfield College 

Music 

Irene Woodburn Wright 

Mus. Bac, Bishop's, A.R.C.T., R.M.T. 

Godfrey Hewitt, F.R.C.O. 

Physicians 
C. K. Rowan-Legg 



Mrs. E. B. Hunter, 

Ottawa Normal School 
J. R. Morgan, B.Sc, 

(Acadia), F.R.S.A. 
A. C. Sinclair, 

B.Sc., (McGill) 
B.P.A., (Boston University) 
B.C.L. (University of Montreal) 
Nurse-Matro77s 
Miss M. E. Bray, Reg.N. 
Mrs. M. S. Boyce 



Director of Administration 

J. S. Irvin, R.M.C. 

Headmaster's Secretary 

Miss P. A. Caldwell 



M.D., AlcGill, D.C.H., England, F.A.A.P. 
C. B. Petrie, M.D. 
Junior Tutor 
P. M. Gillean 

Bursar 
Mrs. W. S. Pryde 
Accountant School Secretary 

Robert Hoi^ Mrs. \'. E. Gensey 



'W% 



U I*'- 



V 



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1111 SI All- — l';6^-l';64 
Back Rou\ A. deK. N'arent, B. K. Hillary, R. J. Anderson, J. R. Morgan, P. M. Gillean, 

L. I. H. Spencer, A. C. Sinclair, A. J. Hancock. 
Middle Roiv: R. Bernasconi, E. C. Artwell, B. B. Vincent, H. J. Woods, J. L. Black, 

I. C. Pemberton, H. S. Dalton, J. S. Batts. 
Fro?it Row. Miss W. Black, A. H. N. Snelgrove, D. L. Polk, Master in Charge Junior 

School, A. D. Brain, Asst. Headmaster, R. H. Perry, Headmaster, L. H. Sibley, 

Director of Studies, J. J. Marland, Sr. Alaster, K. B. Monks, Mrs. H. S. Dalton. 
Absent: Irene Woodburn Wright. 



THE PREFECTS — 1963-1964 
Back Row. R. W. Horner, R. M. L. Smallian, A. W. Anderson, G. R. Carton, G. B. 

KeflFer. 
Front Row. W. J. Booth, Capt. of the Day Boys, D. B. McGaughey, Capt. of the School, 

R. H. Perrv, Esq., C. P. Roberts, Capt. of the Boarders, P. C. Hunt. 



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*-"*^J 



.9^ *i 



THE ASH B U Rl AN 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Board of Governors 2 

Ashburian Staff 3 

The Staff 4 

School Officers 7 

Editorial 8 

School Notes 9 

Chapel Notes 11 

In Memoriam 18 

Cadet Inspection 21 

Sports 

Football 24 

Soccer 29 

Hockey 35 

Skiing 37 

Curling 38 



PAGE 

Basketball 39 

Cricket 40 

Athletics 44 

The Closing Ceremony .... 48 

Prize List 51 

Headmaster's Conference ... 54 

Science Notes 55 

Poetr}' Reading Competition . . 56 

Literary Section 58 

Old Boys Section 67 

The U.K. Reunion 68 

Ashbury Development 

Campaign 77 

Junior Section 79 

School Roll 117 

Exchanges 121 



THE ASH R U RI AN 



SCHOOL OFFICERS 



Captain of the School 
D. B. McGaughey 



Captain of the Boarders 
C. P. Roberts 



Captain of the Day Boys 
\\\ J. Booth 



A. VV. Anderson 
G. R. Carton 



W'oollconibe 
D. B. McGalghey 

Football 
G. B. Keffer 

Hockey 
R. AI. Smali.ian 



Prefects 
R. W. Horner 
P. C. Hunt 

House Captains 

Connanght 
R. W. Horner 

Gaines Captains 

Cricket 

B. J. Cooper 

Soccer 
D. B. McCalghey 

CADET CORPS 



C. B. Keffer 
R. M. Smaleian 



Alexander 
P. C. Hunt 

Skiing 
R. W. Horner 

Basketball 
D. J. .\ I leaner 



Officer Coiiwianding Second in Connnand 

C/Major a. W. Anoerson C/Capt. D. A. F. Spry 

Guard Commander 
C/Lt. W. J. Booth 

Platoon Covmianders 
C/Lieuts. B. T. Johnston, C. P. Roberts, C. Heggtveit 

Company Sergeant Major Qxtartertnaster Sergeant 

C/W02 M. BiRou C/Sgt. R. A. Lash 



Driint Major 
C/Sgt. I. H. Parker 



O.C. Flag Party 
Acting C/Lieut. G. Keffer 




I). W. McCaugiii > 
Captain of the School 



C P. Rokerps 
Captain of the Boarders 



THE ASHBURIAN 



EDITORIAL 

"Most of us here today are not leaders and never will be. Wc are 
if you like, in the second class." So said the guest speaker, His Excel- 
lency J. S. Reid, at the Closing Day Ceremony, a full report of which is 
to be found in this issue of the Ashburian. He cited Somerset Maughan's 
contention, made to answer the critics, that fulfillment can be found in 
the "front row of second raters." He might well have used the example 
of an indigenous product, Ottawa's poet of the Post-Confederation era, 
Archibald Lampman, who reticently yet accurately assessed his own verse 
as superior poetry of a minor order. At all events, an antidote to the 
popular conception of the independent school's exclusive preoccupation 
with the qualities of leadership is always welcome. Indeed the whole 
question of what kind of education a particular school desires is especially 
relevant in a year when Ashbury launches an appeal for funds, the 
details of which are also within these pages. The role of the independent 
school ought to be closely scrutinized when society is taking an increas- 
ing interest in education and when nations talk of education as an invest- 
ment. Certainly there ought to be a greater awareness of the capability 
of this kind of school by parents, students and staff alike. 



TH E ASH B U Rl AN 9 

SCHOOL NOTES 

The School \car opened on W ednesday, September 4rh and closed 
on Saturday, June 6th. The 1964-65 y<^ar begins on Tuesday, 8th 
September for Boarders, \\ ednesday, 9th September for Day Boys. 

* * * 

There were several new members of Staff last Session. In the 
Senior School they were Mr. J. S. Batts, from King's College School, 
Wimbledon, to teach English; Mr. A. J. Hancock, from Palmers' School, 
Essex, to teach Science, Both came here directly from England. Also 
joining the Staff were Mr. B. B. Vincent, from Baron Byng High School, 
Montreal, to teach English and Geography; and Mr. R. Bernasconi from 
Switzerland, who arrived for the Winter Term. 

* * * 

In the Junior School there were some changes following the departure 
of Mr, Daratha and Mr. Fronton, and we welcomed Mr. J. R. Morgan 
and Mr. A. C. Sinclair. 

* * * 

Mrs. E. B, Hunter, formerly of the Junior School Staff, returned in 
the Spring as a Special Tutor, 

* * * 

Twenty-five members of the 1963 graduating class enrolled at 
Universities in Canada and the United States. 

* * * 

Parents' Receptions were held in Argyle on November 1st and 
February" 21st and May 1st. 

* * * 

Saturday night movies were again presented in Argyle bv^ Mr. 
Sibley throughout the year, and proved to be very successful. One of 
the highlights was the presentation of Hitchcock's "The Birds" while 
the film was still going around the commercial circuits. 

* * * 

Speakers in the Career Series during the Autumn and Winter Terms 
were: Mr. J. Eraser on "Foreign Aifairs"; Mr. F, W. Troop on "Banking 
as a Career"; Mr. C, Young on "Journalism"; Dr. J. A. Hutchison on 
"Veterinary Surgery"; and Mr. H. Good on "Accountancy". 

* * # 

L. I. H. Spencer is leaving the Staff after a distinguished stay in the 
Junior School. His dynamic personality and varied interests in students' 
activities have made him a respected figure throughout the whole school. 
We wish him well in his new post as Head of the Junior School at Halifax 
Grammar School, Nova Scotia. 



10 



THE ASH BU RI AN 



Major H. J. Woods is retiring from Ashbury, and hopes to devote 
more time to painting, in a studio in Ottawa. 

* * * 

Both the Junior and Senior School lose Staff when Air. and Mrs. 
H. S. Dalton move to Nova Scotia. We wish them well in their new 

environment at Digby. 

* * * 

We congratulate Mr. I. C. Pemberton on his obtaining a post- 
graduate award at the University of Rochester, U.S.A., where he will be 
studying Canadian-American relations in the History Faculty. 

* * * 

W^e say farewell also to Mr. J. L. Black who is moving to Montreal 
to study full-time for a Ph.D. at AIcGill. 

* * * 

We say farewell too to A4r, A. de K. Varent from the Ashbury 
Teaching Staff, but hope to see something of him while he is studying at 

Ottawa University. 

* * * 

Air. B. B. Vincent is leaving to return to England after teaching in 
various parts of the world for several years. W^e wish him well. 

* * * 

The College Football Dinner was held on November 22 nd and the 
guest speaker was J. S. (Joe) Irvin Jr. who presented the trophies, crests 
and awards. 



THE STUDENTS' COMMITTEE — 1963-1Q64 
Back Row. J. M. Golding, R. J. .Millar, J. H. Smellic, J. P. Dawson, C. H. C. Grant, 

R. N. Tifft, D. G. Love, I. D. MacKenzie, R. W. Scheel. 
Front Row. B. J. Berry, R. A. Lash, B. L. Deacon, R. H. Perry, Esq., C. P. Roberts, 

W. J. Booth, P. C. Hunt. 
Absent: S. B. Da\ . 




THE ASH B U RI AN 



11 



CHAPEL NOTES 

The Chapel continues to be a source of inspiration and strength to 
the school. A large number of people work loyally together so that we 
can worship Ciod in the beauty^ of holiness. It is not possible to mention 
them all by name, and none of them would want to be thanked, but we 
should mention the continued support and interest of the Headmaster. 



THE CHOIR 

The choir had a difficult year. Last September we found that most 
of the best voices had changed and we had to start from scratch again. 
Many thanks to Mr. Godfrey Hewitt for doing so well during the course 
of the year. 




THE CHOIR 1 .(,5-1964 

Back Roiv: D. Peterson, G. D. Blyth. F. J. Braathen, F. .\I. Stead, ,M. K. G. \"cnables, 

G. C. Baxter, P. A. Bounsall. 
Middle Roii-. Rev. K. B. .Monks, P. M. McGuff, P. G. Loftus, D. A. H. Macfarlane, 

N. F. Day, W. J. Winficld, Rev. E. C. Attwell. 
Front Row. R. B. Reid, T. D. Boyd, Al. L. W. Barnes, D. Prvde, R. C. Perlcv, J. A. 

McRuer, Al. AI. L. J. Troniak. ' 
Absent: J. E. Hovt. 



Sept. 


22, 


1963 


Rev. Col. James Barnett 


Sept. 


29, 


1963 


Rev. Roland Bodger 


Oct. 


20, 


1963 


Rev. Frank Lawler 


Nov. 


24, 


1963 


Rev. P. Meggs 


Dec. 


8, 


1963 


Rev. Harvvood-Jones 


Jan. 


26, 


1964 


Rev- E. E. Green 


Feb. 


16, 


1964 


Mr. Wm. Navan 

Lay Reader and Organist 


Mar. 


8, 


1964 


Rev. John Duncan 


April 


12, 


1964 


Mr. T. G. Sewell, Layreader 


April 


26, 


1964 


Rev. Michael Peers 


April 


30, 


1964 


Rt. Rev. E. S. Reed 


May 


10, 


1964 


Rev. P. Playfair 


May 


31, 


1964 


Rev. E. Davis 



12 T H E ASH B U Rl AN 

We are very fortunate to have Airs. Thurston assisted by Airs. 
Venables, Mrs. Alonks and Airs. Perley for our Choir Alothers. 

Every year we have been privileged to welcome a number of dis- 
tinguished visiting clergy at the Sunday services. This year it was our 
good fortune to have the following, 

St. Bartholomew's, Ottawa 
Beaurepaire, P.Q. 
St. Margaret's, Eastview 
St. Matthew's, Ottawa 
St. Thomas', Ottawa 
All Saints, Westboro 
St. iMargaret's, Eastview 

All Saints, Ottawa 
St. Margaret's, Eastview 
Carleton University 
Bishop of Ottawa 
St. George's, Ottawa 
St. Stephen's, Ottawa 

The three annual Corporate School Communions were celebrated 
as usual; during the fall term on All Saints Day; during the winter term 
on Ash Wednesday; during the Spring term on Ascension Day. The 
two chaplains celebrated. 

THE CONFIR.MATION SERATCE 

The Right Rev. E. S. Reed, Ai.A., D.D., Lord Bishop of Ottawa 
confirmed 12 boys by the historic rite of "Laying On of Hands" in the 
Chapel, on April 30 at 8.00 p.m. 

A beautiful Altar Book in dark blue was presented by Air. A. H. N. 
Snelgrove and dedicated by the Bishop to the glory of God and in loving 
memory of Ethel Aiinnie Snelgrove. 

Servers Aledallions were presented to A4cNair, A4ulaner, Lawson, 
Sark and Sigvaldason and Cann I. 

Rev. E. C. Attwell acted as the Bishop's Chaplain and the lessons 
were read by Johnston and Love. 

CANDIDATES FOR CONFIRAiATION 

Patrick Michael Anketell-Jones — Aylmer, P.Q. 

Geoffrey David Barber — Montreal, P.Q. 

William Henry Bruns Gann — Yonkcrs, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Terrance James Cochrane — Ottawa, Ont. 

James Gregory Cook — Bonn, Ciermany 

Stuart Cadman Dean — Toronto, Ont. 

Peter Donald Golding — Halifax, NS. 

Andrew Duncan Gow — Ottawa, Ont. 

Hugh Hopkins Johnson — Ottawa, Ont. 

Pliilip Cjtahame Loftus — Beulah, Michigan, U.S.A. 

John Henry Nclms — Ottawa, Ont. " 

Peter Russel Thurston — Ottawa, Ont. 



THE ASH B U Rl AN 



13 




THE CONFIRMATION CLASS — 1963-1964 

Back Row. P. AI. Anketeli-Jones, T. J. Cochrane, S. C. Dean, P. D. Golding, A. D. Gow, 

P. G. Loftus. 
Middle Roiv: Rev. E. C. Amvell, J. H. Nelms, W. H. B. Cann, P. R. Thurston, J. G. 

Cook, G. D. Barber, H. H. Johnson, Rev. K. B. Monks. 
Front Rozv: D. G. Love, A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., Rt. Rev. E. S. Reed, R. H. Perry, Esq., 

T. B. Johnston. 



It has become a custom for the young ladies from Elmwood to come 
to the Ashbury Chapel services quite frequently. This is a very happy 
custom, for all concerned. We hope it will be a permanent arrangement. 
The Headmistress, Mrs. Blyth, has been most co-operative. With her 
permission, the Elmwood Choir assisted with the singing on Sunday 
Jan. 26 and they sang an anthem "The Lord is my Shepherd". Their 
attractive green robes were a pleasing contrast to the red cassocks of the 
Ashburv^ choir. The lesson was read by the head boarder Aliss Jeanette 
MacDonald. We hope this will become a yearly event. 

On Sunday .Mar. 15 Mr. WilHam Navan, the blind organist and 
Lay Reader at St. Margaret's Eastview, brought his junior choir to the 
chapel. They sang an anthem entitled "Souls of Men" and joined with 
the Ashbury choir for the rest of the service, with Mr. Navan at the 
organ. It was an added touch to the beauty, dignity and reverence of 
the Service. 



14 TH E ASH B U RI AN 

The Candle Light Service, properly called the Service of The Nine 
Lessons, took place on December 15th at 8.00 p.m. for parents and 
visitors and again for the boys on Tuesday at 4.00 p.m. We were 
pleased to welcome the Junior Choir from St. Bartholomew's Church 
among our guests. As our choir was not quite strong enough to carry it 
alone. Air. Godfrey Hewitt, the .Master of the Choir brought several 
boys from the Cathedral Choir to help. 

The Chapel now has a Sacristan. This year Cann I took on the 
service of looking after the Sanctuary, changing the hangings, preparing 
the altar and many other details. He was very efficient and conscien- 
tious. 



THE CHAPEL OFFERINGS 

The Chapel tries to be self-supporting by purchasing hymn and 
prayer books, flowers and other supplies. 

We still continue to support two Zulu boys at St. Christopher's 
School in Swaziland. They are very appreciative and rv\'o of them 
are corresponding with two of our boys. Millar is writing to 
Enock Bmingo and Armitage is in touch with David Mathe. Any- 
one else interested in an African pen-pal should get the address from 
the Chaplain. 

We hope to send a donation of fl 50 to the Ashbury V^illage church 
in England. They are in urgent need of assistance to repair the 
church roof which has been weakened by the death watch beetle. 



THE SERVERS 

The Servers' Guild is a group of boys who offer their services for 
anything that is required for the chapel. This year, as usual, they have 
been active. 

Last September while the choir was being reorganized they supplied 
a temporary choir. 

Both the Co-Head Servers preached very acceptable sermons at the 
two Servers Services. Both put in many hours being trained. Brian 
Johnston preached on Dec. 1st on "Observing Lent". 

The subject of Love's sermon was "Onward Christian Soldiers". 
These servers also preached at St. Bartholomew's, St. Margaret's, All 
Saints, and other Ottawa Churches, Both of them were a credit to 
Ashbury. 

The Chapel Clerks Keffer, Anderson, and Lynn have served faitli- 
fully and well. We recommend them for future Sidesmen and Church 
Wardens. 



THE AS H B U Rl AN 



n 




THE SER\'ERS 



1963-1964 



Back Row. E. L. Lynn, A. W. Anderson, G. B. Keffer. 

Middle Row. R. K. Souch, G. S. Sigvaldason, O. K. Lawson, B.H. Haddad, T. L. Mac- 
Donald, G. D. Barber, T. G. P. Cann. 

Front Row. E. F. Burritt, D. J. Mulaner, D. G. Love, Rev. K. B. Monks, T. B. Johnston, 
R. B. McNair, A. J. Sark. 



THE JUNIOR CHAPEL 

The juniors had their daily service in the Chapel separately from the 
seniors. Re\^ Mr, x\tr\vell was assisted by the monitors and members 
of the staff who read the lessons. Mr. Polk read the lessons at the begin- 
ning and end of each term. The juniors who read were Armitage, 
Ennis-Smith, Farrugia, Michaelson, Neilson, Moulds, Sharp, Xelms, 
Gow, Harsh, Tyas. The masters who read were Messrs. Hilliary, Mor- 
gan, Sinclair, also Miss Black. Tvas was the very capable Chapel 
Monitor. Each Friday, Rev. Mr. Monks led the weekly hymn-sing. 

Mr. L. I. H. Spencer conducted the daily religious exercises for the 
Roman Catholic boys. We are sorry that he will not be with us again 
next year but we \\'ish him every happiness in his new position. 



16 



THE ASHBU Rl AN 



HERBERT S. DALTON 



After a nine year stretch as a member of the Mathematics Depart- 
ment "Herbie" has left Ashbury to run a .Motel in the land of Scallops 
at Digby, Nova Scotia. 

Mr. Dalton joined the Ashbur>^ Staff in 1955 after a tour of duty at 
King's College School and Lakefi'eld. He was a quiet (except when 
angry) dependable Schoolmaster and served Ashbury well and faithfully 
In addition to his class work he operated the Stationery Room and 
coached Soccer and Cricket. 

All of us hope that Herbie's knowledge of Maths will be useful as 
he manages the Tea Cup Inn finances and that the future will bring him 
much happiness. 

(We regret that a photo of Mr. Dalton was not available. See Staff 
picture on Page 5 ) . 




MRS. H. S. DALTON 

This year we say au revoir to Mrs. Dalton who is leaving us after 
ten years as the Form I teacher and five years as Chapel Organist. 
During this period Mrs. Dalton has started many small boys on their 
academic voyage and has patiently helped them over their early hurdles. 

We wish her health and happiness in her new venture at the Tea 
Cup Inn. 



7' H E A S H li U R I A N 



n 



THE MSIT OF HIS MA II. STY IIAILK SKLASSIE I 




Lidy .Michael Alengasha, Emperor Haile Selassie, Prince .Michael .Makonnen 



At eleven o'clock on the morning of October the 8th a cavalcade of 
cars drove up to the front of the school. In the lead were two members 
of the R.C.M.P. on motor bikes. \\^hen the first car stopped at the 
front door out stepped a slight, bearded figure, dressed in military uni- 
fomi and \\earing a splendid array of ribbons. This was the Emperor 
of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie — "King of Kings, the Elect of God and 
Conquering Lion of Judah". Accompanying him was His Highness Ras 
Imeru Haile Selassie, the Crown Prince, Brigadier General Assefa 
Demese, His Excellency Berhanu Duke, the Ambassador delegate from 
Ethiopia to the United States, Princess Ruth Desta and our o\\'n trio of 
Michael Makonnen, .Michael .Mengasha and .Merid Birou. 

Accompanied by the Headmaster the Royal Party toured the School, 
visiting the Dining-Room, Chapel and Classrooms. Finally, in the .Main 
Hall, the Emperor greeted the students and asked for a half holiday, in 
repK^ to which the students gave three very hearty cheers. 



IS THE ASHBU Rl AN 

3n iWemoriam 

The flowers on the Altar on December 1st, were to the glory of 
God, and in loving memory of Richard Busk, son of Air Commodore 
and Mrs. C. W. Busk of England. Richard was a student at Ashbury 
from 1948 to 1949 and passed away on Dec. 8, 1949. 

Senator D. K. /MacTavish died Nov. 15th as the result of an automo- 
bile accident near Toronto. He was a governor of the School for many 
years and Chairman of the Board of Governors in 1950. His son, 
Duncan, is presently a day boy. 

Mrs. Theodore Rossy, the mother of Richard Rossy, died in an 
automobile accident on Oct. 15, 1963. 

Mr. Julius Schwartzman, died Jan. 5th. His son, Harvey, left 
Ashbury shortly afterwards to enter his father's business. 

E. Keith Davidson (1908-16) passed away October 1st, 1963 in 
Ottawa after a brief illness, ending a colourful career and a close associa- 
tion with Ashbury. A graduate of R.M.C., he sensed in World War I 
as a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps and was a Charter member of the 
Ottawa Flying Club. He was president of Davidson Lumber Co. and 
a Governor of the School for many years. 

Henry Aldous Aylen (1907-14). Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Ontario and active in many area organizations, died after a heart attack 
at his home in Oakville. 

Ronald Costom (1955-60). Died as a result of a motor car accident 
in Montreal on November 8th, 1963. 

Stanley Barkum (1954-57). After a short illness Stanley Barkun 
passed away on July 2nd, 1963. 

Fred H. Blackburn (Entered 1894). Died November 15th, 1963. 
Mr. Blackburn was one of the oldest graduates of Ashbury and a promi- 
nent Ottawan. 

Adam George Steven Podhradsky passed away on December 10th 
after a long illness and a courageous battle. He attended Ashburv^ from 
1956 to 1963. 

Sgt.-Major F. W. Stone, Physical Instructor at Ashbury from 1924- 
1938, died on December 8th, 1963. (See also page 75.) 

Gill Gamble (1960-62). Son of iMr. and Mrs. Samuel Gamble of 
Ottawa, died in hospital June 23rd, 1964, as the result of an accident. 

Our sincerest sympathy is extended to the members of the families 
of those parents and Old Boys who are listed above. 



THE ASH B U Rl AN 



19 




Adam Podhradsky 



Adam George Steven Podhradsky died in December after a long 
illness. He had been at Ashbury since Junior School days and was a 
School Prefect during the last year. His cheerful face and sparkling 
sense of humour had brightened the sombre school corridors for much 
of this time. Adam was held in the highest regard and respect by all 
who knew him. During last year's Closing Ceremonies he was presented 
with the Headmaster's Cup for character. Spontaneous applause broke 
the noon-day heat that day for a very popular choice. His death 
is a sad loss for his contemporaries and the school. 

To A4rs. Podhradsky the School extends heartfelt sympathies. 

D. McGaughey 
Captain of the School 



THE ASHBUIilAN 



21 



CADET INSPECTION 

This year the College Cadet Corps was rcxicwed by Major-General 
J. P. K. Bernatchcz, C.B.i:., D.S.O., CD., \'ice-Chicf of the General 
Staff. This year in strong contrast to the previous year's downpour of 
rain we were pleased to have a cool if cloud\' afternoon of 1 3th May. 

Several hundred parents and friends were present when the Review- 
ing Officer arrived at the School gates and proceeded to inspect the 
Honour Guard. The Headmaster then introduced the Instructors, 
Captain R. J. Anderson, Rev. K. B. Alonks (S.A.T.), Civ. Inst. J. S. 
Batts (Quartermaster), and Civ. Inst. P. M. Gillean (Drill). 

The Canadian Ciuards Band assisted in the March Past in both 
Column of Platoons and Column of Route. 

The usual demonstrations concluded, Major-General Bernatchez 
addressed the Cadets and announced the prizes. The Parade had turned 
out to be one of the most successful Inspections in recent years. 

OFFICERS AND N.C.O.'s — 1963-1964 
Back Raw: C/Sgt. T. L. MacDonald, C/Sgt. B. G. Allniark, C/Sgt. M. A. Taschereau, 

B. J. Cooper, C/Lt. W. J. Booth, C. H. C. Grant, A. W. Currie, C/Sgt. R. A. Lash, 

R. A. G. Koussava. 
Front Row. C/Lt. C. P. Roberts, C/Lt. T. B. Johnston, C/Capt. D. A. Spry, C/.Maj. 

A. W. Anderson, C/CSM Al. W. H. Birou, C/Lt. G. D. Heggtveit, C/Lt. G. B. 

Keffer, C/Sgt. I. H. Parker. 




Photographs page 20 — Left to Right: The Ashbury Band, Major-General J. P. E. 
Bernatchez and Mrs. Bernatchez are greeted on their arrival. Inspecting the Corps, 
The Headmaster names the Cadet prize winners. The Inspecting Party marching to 
the Saluting Base, General Bernatchez inspecting C/Lt. Booth's Guard of Honour. 




THE BAND — 1963-1964 
Back Roiv: C. B. Munro, D. H. .Maclaren, R. D. Wilson, T. C. Nixon, A. Resnik. 
Middle Row. G. A. Haase, A. iM. Neatby, C. B. H. Stone, H. B. O'Neill, L. V. H. 

AlcAninch, R. P. Wennberg, I. jM. Levine. 
Fro7it Row. G. D. Barber, J. T. Weir, S. A. Leadman, C/Sgt. I. H. Parker, N. F. Snel- 

grove, T. K. Campbell, R. B. Southam. 



THE GUARD OF HONOUR — 1963-1964 

Back Row. R. B. McNair, D. A. Hayley, A. P. D. Gamble, D. A. Reid, J. R. Dodds, 

A. W. Currie. 
Front Row. C. H. C. Grant, D. J. Mulaner, B. J. Berry, B. J. Cooper, D. J. McQuaig, 

T. N. Driedger, R. S. Saunders. 
Officer: C/Lt. W. J. Booth. 
Absent: C. L. Collver. 



^-^'Mi^ 




% 






T H E ASH B U RI AN 23 

RIFLES AT MIDNIGMT 

The army came at midnight They took our ancient bashers 

To take our guns awav Ammo stores and F.N.s 

They left us naught but ancient swords The wireless and the bayonets 

To pass the time of day, And even good old Brens. 

H7.\rf really happened 

Because small arms and ammunition had been stolen from certain 
areas in Quebec, the Government decided to remove into safekeeping all 
weapons held in armouries or by small units in the so called "sensitive" 
area — i.e. centres within easy reach of Quebec (or other) would-be 
terrorists. As Ashburv^ was on the list of units in the danger zone the 
army u^as instructed to pick up its weapons. The Chief Instructor of 
the Ashbury Corps was advised that the removal would take place at 
9.45 p.m. (2145 hours) on February 21st. Unfortunately the vehicle 
broke down, and it was not until after midnight that the detachment 
arrived. The mere presence of armed men, in vehicles, at that hour, 
carrying rifles created something of a stir and the School authorities were 
not at all pleased. Unfortunately- an eager young reporter picked up the 
scent and played games with the facts. The reportorial and political 
consequences were both weird and amusing. 

Honi' it was reported 

Not only did this incident become hot new^s, but it got T.V. cover- 
age and was also debated on the floor of the House. Newspapers across 
Canada carried the story, inevitably using the incident for a rousing game 
of political football. In many papers reference was made to Ashbur)% 
the "Eton" of Canada, with its "now world famous Cadet Corps". 
Hansard carried the full text of the debate in the House on Tuesday 
February 25th 1964 and again on February 26th. It makes delightful 
reading. 

So wide was the newspaper coverage that a Clipping Service pro- 
duced articles from N.S. to B.C., the known count being over 50. 
Finally Time carried an article in its .March 6th edition with a photograph 
of a recent Ashbury Corps on parade. 

Macleans issue of April 4th concluded the affair, using as did one 
or two other papers, a Cartoon to illustrate the removal of the \\eapons. 

It can certainly be said that the publicity introduced Ashbury to 
readers right across Canada — with noticeable results. This years en- 
quiries about the School have been greater than ever and from a much 
more widespread area. 

The students took the business in their stride and went out to put on 
one of the best Cadet Inspections in many years. 



24 THEASHBURIAN 



P 






FOOTBALL 

FIRST TEAM 

The 1963 football season was an extremely satisfactory one. The 
first team entered a city football league for the first time and, after a slow 
beginning, did very well. The fine effort of this team was remarked 
upon by the coach of the Champion Rideau team when he accepted the 
league trophy. 

There were many individual highlights to the season, some of which 
were: Lash catching the fastest Stanstead backfielder from behind; 
Sinclair and Stansbury doing the heavy work against Hillcrest; Reid's 
breakaway runs against Northwood and Stanstead; Rawley's running 
against Ottawa U. High School and Westmount; Smallian and Homer 
combining to defeat Bishops; Berry running down the kicker and getting 
the ball against Rideau Juniors; Cotton blocking a kick against Eastview; 
Hunt's running against Rideau Intermediates and the Old Boys; Wenn- 
berg breaking away against Westmount; Keffer's excellent running and 
defensive play against everyone; Garton kicking extra points. 

Interesting strategic development were the "Wennberg Bounce", 
the "Reid Fumble", and the "Berry kick-pass", all called very cleverly 
by Smallian. 

Every game was a fine team effort but those that stand out were: 
the entire team against Westmount and Stanstead, but the offence in 
particular; the defence against F^astview and Hillcrest. The most excit- 
ing game was that against Bishops, which was won on the last play with 
a new pass put in that week. The most important game for the team 
was the victory over Hillcrest. This game indicated the spirit of the 
squad; Hillcrest had beaten Rideau and were undefeated; our defence 
had been completely changed after a 37-0 loss to Rideau. Although the 
score was low in play Ashbury had the edge the whole game. The most 
satisfactory part of the year for the coach was the co-operation and 
willingness on the part of the players. Many were playing new posi- 
tions and all were playing a new system. In spite of this there were very 
few penalties and there was an excellent distribution of scoring and ball- 
carrying. 

As a conclusion to these general remarks the players for next year 
should be reminded of the formula that was included in last year's letter 
to all prospective football players: 

Conditioning + Determination + Co-operation = Success 



THE ASHBURIAN 



25 



FIRST FOOTBALL TEAM STATISTICS 



( 


G 


W L 




13 


9 4 


ASHBURV 


vs. 


RIDIAU J UN. 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


BELL 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


Ol lAWA U. 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


WESTMOUNT 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


RIDEAU JUN. 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


RIDEAU INT. 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


EASTVIEW 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


STANSTEAD 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


HILLCREST 


ASHBURY 


fs. 


NORTHWOOD 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


RIDEAU INT. 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


BISHOP'S 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


OLD BOYS 



T 


PF 




PA 







195 




181 




14- 6 




W'on 




Away 


13- 7 




Won 




Home 


n-19 




Lost 




Home 


21- 6 




Won 




Away 


33- 7 




Won 




Home 


0-37 




Lost 




Home 


7- 




Won 




Away 


26- 6 




Won 




Away 


7- 6 




Won 




Home 


12-26 




Lost 




Home 


0-21 




Lost 




Away 


21-19 




Won 




Home 


27-21 




Won 




Home 



In the Ottawa High Pigskin Parade Ashburv outscored Bell High School 1 to 0. 









SCORING 


















td's 


Cvt 




S 






Pts 


Rawley 






10 


— 




— 






60 


Wennberg 






6 


— 




— 






36 


Reid 






3 







— - 






18 


Hunt 






3 


— 




— 






18 


Garton 









16 




1 






17 


Keffer 






2 


— 




— 






12 


Smallian 






2 


— 




— 






12 


Horner 






2 


— 




— 






12 


Anderson 






1 


— 




— 






6 


Berry 









— 




4 






4 




RUSHING 








PASSING 










carries 


yds 


.ave 




an 


CODlp 


interc 


tds 


Rawley 


16 


998 


8.6 


Smallian 


44 


22 




6 


1 


Hunt 


82 


599 


7.3 


Garton 


1 













Keffer 


75 


565 


7.5 


Berry 


1 













Wennberg 


78 


433 


5.6 




PASS RECEIVING 






Reid 


41 


247 


6.0 






passes 






yds 


Smallian 


13 


72 


5.5 


Horner 




7 






114 


Garton 


4 


14 


— 


Rawley 




8 






65 


AUmark 


2 


11 


— 


Keffer 




5 






45 


Sveinson 


1 


7 


— 


Reid 




2 






14 



26 T H E A SH B U RI AN 

FIRST FOOTBALL TEAM 

Allmark: Barry, iMost promising but a bit of hard luck put him out 
for the season after a few games. 

Anderson: Tony was a slugger on the line. He had a good year of 
football and pulled a dazzling T.D. against the old boys. 

Berry: Bruce was a tremendous kicker and hit hard no matter what 

position he played. 
Ch ANTLER: Bob's fitst year with the team, always aggressive, won his 

first team colours. 
Cotton: Another newcomer, John filled his position on defence well. 
Emmons: AVayne moved willingly into centre position. 

Gamble: Dave tried his able hand at kick-offs, 1st string guard, and held 
up his position well. 

Garton: Toe was our "jack of all trades" — from fullback, to quarter- 
back, to place kicker. Fine job Toe. 

Goodwin: Didn't see much of Horse this season but he played ruggedly 

in non-league games. 
Hayley: Dave threw his weight around this year, and was a key man in 

the defensive line. 
Heggtveit: Next year should be Gib's year. 

Horner: Little "Jack" has a dandy pair of hands and showed his stuff in 
the Bishop's game. (iMost Improved Player) 

Hunt: Pete had a terrific season despite several minor injuries, holding 
half the honour of Most Valuable Player. 

Keeper: (Captain) George was very inspirational to the team and drove 
for many a yard, a hard-nosed ballplayer. 

Lash: Bob's first year with the team, made many clutch tackles. 
MacDonald: a good first year. 

McNair: First year with the team; next year Bruce should be the back- 
bone of the team. 

McQuAiG: Don stepped in to kick when called upon and booted some 
nice ones. 

O'Brien: Didn't see much of Larry this season, next year he should do 
well. 

Parker: Ian played hard at defence and should excel next year. 
Rawley: Kim always played a terrific game both ways, gaining the most 
yards of the season and splitting for honour of iMost \^aluable Player. 
Reid: Dave filled in at several positions and ran very well at halfback. 

Sinclair: (Asst. Capt.) Sine did a powerful job this year of holding up 
the right side of the line. 



THE AS H B U Rl AN 



21 



Smallian: (Asst. Capt.) In centre of action on field (Q.B.), we owe 
much of our success to Smalls (W'edi^e). 

SouiHAM: Rick always gave his best when called upon and as a result 
improved greatly. 

Stansbury: Bob played his hardest at all times, gave the team spirit and 
won Most \^iluable Lineman, 

Sveinson: Don filled in most ably when needed. 

Tifft: Jiggs showed promise when playing with first team. 

Wennberg: Rick gained many valuable yards in his first year at fullback, 
developed the "Wennberg bounce". 

Booth (Mgr.): Bill helped many an injured player off the field. 

Sark (Mgr.): "I'm not a waterboy, I'm an assistant manager." 

Mr. Black (Coach): Mr. Black showed that we could grive the hiirh 
schools a run for their money. 

On behalf of the players, many thanks are extended to our coach, 
Mr. Black, for a s^reat season. 



FIRST FOOTBALL TEAM — 1963-1964 
Winners of the B.C.S. Old Boys' Trophy and "G.P." Cup 

Back Row: R. J. Stansbury, W. A. Emmons, B. J. Berry, B. G. Allmark, R. S. Chantler, 

L. O. O'Brien, A. P. D. Gamble, D. J. Goodwin. 
Third Row. J. L. Black, Esq., R. B. Southam, R. N. Tifft, D. A. Reid, G. D. Heggtveit, 

R. B. McNair, G. R. Garton, T. L. MacDonald, D. G. Sveinson, R. H. Perry, Esq. 
Seco?id Roiv: D. A. Hayley, R. P. Wennberg, R. W. Horner, R. M. L. Smallian, Vice- 

Capt., G. B. Keffer, Capt., I. R. Sinclair, \'ice-Capt., A. W. Anderson, K. H. Rawlev. 
Front Row. A. J. Sark, I. H. Parker, D. J. McQuaig, J. AI. Cotton, R. A. Lash, W. J. 

Booth. 
Abseyit: P. C. Hunt. 









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SECOND FOOTBALL TEAM 

Our record of two wins and five losses is not impressive. Neverthe- 
less the players will agree that the season was an exciting and valuable 
one. A pleasing factor was the high competitive spirit which was main- 
tained. Perhaps the highlight was our home and home series with 
Selwyn House. We lost the first game 22-24 on our grounds and came 
back with a 7-2 win when we played them in Montreal. 

Dawson as Captain and Benskin as Vice-Captain contributed much, 
and both boys have great potential for next year's first squad. 

We thank Mr. Hillary for his fine coaching. We were weary boys 
by the end of the practice sessions, but it was good for us. 






f 



23 §2 a? I^M^^^^^-P 

-* ■'^ >mk ^f r* ?^ 1^ ^i| I; 



SECOND FOOTBALL TLAM — 1963-1964 
Back Row. J. B. Scott, J. G. Cook, W. T. MacKenzie, G. D. Smith, P. R. Slioup. A. I). 

MacDougall, M. I). Wennberg, O. K. Lawson, E. L. Lvnii. 
Middle Row. B. K. Hillary, Esq., J. G. MacLarcn, R. W. Scheel, T. N. Driedger, S. A. 

Leadman, J. R. Dodds, L. V. H. AlcAninch, G. D. Barber, J. A. Kenny, G. E. 

Raymond, J. D. Lcdingham. 
Front Row. A. G. E. C. Patton, A. J. Waxnian, R. I). Olsen, J. P. Dawson, Capt., G. R. \'. 

Benskin, V^ice-Capt., P. E. iMacPhail, D. A. Shaw. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



29 



SOCCER 

FIRST SOCCER TEAM 

For the second year in the row the first team had seven players 
returning, these so-called "veterans" formed the nucleus of the team. 
The players returning were Danny .Mc(jaughe\', Dave Alulaner, Andy 
Zaporski, Harvey Schwartzman, Ed Riddell, Brian Johnston and Barry 
Cooper, ^^'ith these players returning and havincj some very crood new 
material Mr. "Smiles" Anderson with extra coaching help from Mr. 
Hancock, found it easy to form an effective team. After getting off to a 
good start in the League and progressing to the finals, over-confidence 
and bad conditions led to our ehmination. Following is a short analysis 
of each game (not too prejudiced I hope). 
1. Our season started with the annual game against O.V.C.C. The 

team having only a week and a half of training was not really up for 



FIRST SOCCER TEAM — 1963-1964 
Back Ro-iv: A. J. Hancock, Esq., E. A. Riddell, A. M. Zapvorski, H. M. Schwartzman, 

C. P. Roberts, .M. Birou, R. J. Anderson, Esq. 
Middle Roiv: M. A. Taschereau, D. J. .Mulaner, D. B. McGaughev, Capt., B. J. Cooper, 

Vice-Capt., T. B. Johnston, I. AI. Levine. 
Front Row. C. L. CoUver, J. S. Evans, G. B. Livingstone. 



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30 T H E ASH BU RI AN 

the game and so, it was reinforced with Messrs. Anderson and Han- 
cock and last year's captain Rusty Davidson. This was a hard 
fought game, with Ashbury coming from behind twice to even the 
score and having a very debatable goal disallowed. However, as 
usual experience triumphed over youth, the final score was 3-2. 
Hancock and Riddell talHed for Ashbury. 

2. The second game of the year was a league game against Ridgemont 
High School. The team having played Ridgemont before knew it 
would have to be in its top form to beat this relatively inexperienced 
but full-of-drive team. The first half of the game was indecisive 
with the action being split evenly, however right from the face off 
in the second half Ridgemont's offence surged through our defence 
and scored. There was no further scoring until half way in the 
period when two quick goals, one by Johnston, the other by Cooper 
salted the game away for Ashbury. 

3. The team's next game was another league game, this time against 
Hillcrest. This was really a pushover for Ashbury, and conditions 
kept the score from being a lot higher. ]\lcGaughey collected 
Ashbury's two goals. 

4. We played an exhibition game against Eastview on Ashbury ground 
2 days after our last game. The outcome of the game was very 
surprising to our coach Mr. Anderson who had picked us to lose. 
Again Ashbury dominated the play for most of the game. Mc- 
Gaughey scored all four of our goals, two in each half. 

5. We travelled next to Kemptville for a game against the Kcmptville 
Agricultural School. Last year we had soundly defeated this team 
and the knowledge of this plus the overconfidence bred by our good 
start this year almost led to our downfall. Kemptville had im- 
proved immensely since last year and held us to a 3-2 victory which 
we had to fight like grim death to hold on to. McGaughey again 
scored all three goals. 

6. After our mediocre showing against Kemptville, Mr. Anderson had 
drilled us a bit harder than usual for our league game against Rideau. 
We had suffered a humiliating defeat to Rideau last year and the 
members of last year's team now had a chance to revenge themselves. 
They took the chance, defeating Rideau 6-0. After scoring five goals 
in the first half Mr. Anderson gave some younger boys a chance to 
play for the second half. The goal scorers were McGaughey with 
four, Riddell and Birou with each singletons. 

7. Now came the big game of the year, the game against Eastview 
which would decide who came first in our section of Ottawa. They 
had the advantage of playing on their own ground backed by their 



THEASHBURIAN 31 

supporters and \vc had the advantage of already beating them 4-0. 
The game was fast and furious and was tied at 1-1 in the first period, 
with a final score of 2 to 1 in favour of Eastview. Ashbury 
advanced to the semi-finals against Nepean, the first team in the 
Western section. 

8. Before playing Nepean we met Stanstead on the Westhill I ligh 
School Soccer field. The pace of this game was slower than most 
of our games with the only goal being scored in the first few minutes 
of the 2[ame by Cooper on a free kick. 

Now came the game the team had been waiting on pins and needles 
for, the semi-finals against Nepean. This game was played at Brewer's 
Park under almost perfect conditions. The pace of the game was fast 
and furious and the only goal scored, by Nepean, came after the Ashbury 
team had been rearranged due to an injury to the center half. The out- 
come of the game came as a great disappointment both to the team and 
coach. Even though we lost the game it filled us with determination to 
do well in our last few games. 

W'e then played the annual double-header against Northwood 
School from Lake Placid, New York. Northwood always puts up a 
good fight and this year was certainly no exception. In the first game 
of the double header Ashbury managed to defeat the Lake Placid team 
3-0. Two goals were scored in the first half one each by AIcGaughey and 
Riddell. McGaughey scored again to round out the scoring. 

xAfter resting our aches and pains for a night, we again took the field 
ag^ainst Northwood. It looked as if this game was going to end in a 
scoreless tie, however, with just five minutes remaining AIcGaughey 
recovered the ball just over half way, dribbled through the whole North- 
wood defence and put the ball and the goalie in the net. This was the 
first time since Ashbury and Northwood have played that Ashbury has 
swept a doubleheader and the team was understandably proud of itself. 

To take some of our self assurance away iMr. Anderson arranged a 
game against Carleton University. Ashbury won the toss and took the 
end with the wind and field advantage. This proved to be our \\'aterloo 
as Carleton scored three goals against us when we had the advantages, 
yet in the second half when they had the advantages they could not 
score, unfortunately neither could we. The final score was 3-0 for 
Carleton. 

Then came the game against Bishops, this game was played at 
Bishops in detestable conditions, as it either rained or snowed all the way 
through the game. For the first half the play was mostly for us and the 
score after the first half was 1-1. The play in the second half was com- 
pletely dominated by Ashbury as the team scored five unanswered goals. 



32 



THE ASHBURIAN 



The goal scorers were AIcGaughey with 3, Johnston, Riddell and Birou 
with singletons. 

Now came the (friendly?) game against the masters. Even though 
the masters had outside help, their rheumatism and arthritis brought 
about by old age kept the game from being close. AIcGaughey and 
Riddell scored for Ashbur>' and Mr. Batts managed somehow to put the 
ball in the net for the masters. 

In the last game of the season against the Old Boys, the team was 
determined to put up a good fight. This game was a good game as far 
as we were concerned as we defeated the old boys to the tune of 5-2, as 
well as having three goals called back. The goal scorers were AIc- 
Gaughey with 2, Johnston, Birou and Riddell with singletons. 

The season was capped off with the Sports' Dinner at which the 
following awards were given. Alost A'^aluable Player went to Daniel 
AIcGaughey for his outstanding play during the year, Alost Improved 
player to Brian Johnston, Colours were reawarded to AIcGaughey and 
Cooper, and new colours were awarded to Alulaner, Riddell, Johnston 
and Zaporski. 



1st SOCCER RESULTS 



OA^C.C. 




3-2 


Lost 


Home 


Ridgemont 




2-1 


Won 


Home 


Hilicrest 




2-0 


Won 


Home 


Eastview 




4-0 


Won 


Home 


Kemptville 
Rideau 




3-2 
6-0 


Won 
Won 


Away 
Home 


Eastview 
Stanstead 




2-1 
1-0 


Lost 
Won 


Away 
Away 


Nepean 
Northwood 




1-0 
3-0 


Lost 
Won 


Away 
Home 


Northwood 




1-0 


Won 


Home 


Carleton 




3-0 


Lost 


Away 


Bishops 




6-1 


Won 


Away 


Masters and Staff 




2-1 


Won 


Home 


Old Boys 




5-2 


Won 


Home 


SCORING STATISTICS 






The Team 


Yrs. on 


Tea?>i 


Position 


Goals 


Dan AIcGaughey (Capt.) 
B. Cooper (V. Capt.) 
Birou 






C.F. 
C.H. 
R.W. 


23 
2 
3 


Collyer 






R.I. 





Johnston 






L.W. 


3 


Leving 






L.H. 





Livingstone 
Mulaner 






R.H. 
Q. 






Riddell 






R.L 


6 


Roberts 






R.D. 





Schwartzman 






R.H. 





Taschcreau 






L.H. 





Zaporski 






R.D. 






THE ASH B U Rl AN 



33 



SECOND SOCCER 

Our Second Soccer Te;ini had quire a good season, w inninor four, 
tying one and losing two. A\'ithout excuses, we mav point out that the 
two losses were to senior teams previousK' plavcd hv our First XI. 

Under the coaching of Air. Peniberton, a great deal of enthusiasm 
was maintained and we look for several of the Team to give valuable 
service next vear with .Mr. Anderson's Firsts. 

Snelgrove was C^iptain and developed into a \aluable field manager. 




SECOND SOCCER TEAM — 1963-1964 

Back Rou\ J. M. Thurlow, \'icc-Capt.. I. D. Muckcnzic. B. H. lEuldad, V. S. Davies, 

R. H. Hammond, T. K. Campbell. 
Middle Rozl-. H. B. O'Neill. R. S. Saunders. 13. C. Polk. A. Resnik. C. B. Munro. G. \1. 

Samples, I. C. B. Peniberton, Esq. 
Fro7Jt Ron-. .M. G. Pankhurst, J. H. Sniellie, N. F. Snelgrove, Capr., J. \'. P. Hearne, 

R. J. Millar, D. H. .MacLaren. 



34 



THE ASHBURIAN 




Trophy Winners — McGauhey, Stansbury, Rawley, A-IahPhain, Hunt, Johnston, Horner. 

THE FOOTBALL DINNER 

The Annual Football Dinner was held on Friday, November the 
22nd to honour the members of the Football and Soccer Teams. 

The Headmaster, as Chairman, introduced the various guests and 
called on Keffer and McGaughey to propose toasts to the Football and 
Soccer Teams respectively. 

The Guest Speaker for the occasion was Joe Irvin (Junior) who 
related highlights in his career as a footballer at Ashbury, McGill and 
with the Ottawa Rough Riders. 

Various presentations followed including those to the players and 
coaches. 



THE AWARDS 

LEE SNELLING TROPHY— Kim Rawley, Peter Hunt. 
TINY HERMANN TROPHY— R. W. Horner. 
LINESiMAN AWARD - R. L. Stansbury 
BARRY O'BRIEN TROPHY— Peter MacPhail. 
DAVID M. BOSWELL TROPHY— Gerry Benskin. 
R. J. ANDERSON TROPHY— Daniel McGaughey. 
R. H. PERRY TROPHY— Danny Johnston. 

FIRST TEAM COLOURS— Football: Repeat— Horner, Hunt, KcflFcr, Rawley, Reid, 
Sinclair, Smallian, Stansbury, Wennberg. Neiv — Anderson, Berrv, Chantler, Garton, 
Hayley I. Soccer: Repeat — Cooper, .McGaughey. New — Mulaner I, Riddell, 
Roberts, Zaporski. 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 



3S 



HOCKEY 

FIRST HOCKEY TEAM 

Bob Smalliax— As Captain Bob led us through thick and thin, driving 
all the time to win the .Most \^aluable Plaver award. Bob also led 
the team in scoring, making many beautiful goals. 

Bob Stansbury— Bob was the work-horse of the team, playing strongly 
both offensively and defensively, a tremendous team player. 

Barry All.mark— Barrv really stood out this year. \\'hile on the ice he 
was a tenacious checker. He picked up a few stitches as a result 
of his rugged play. 







1 ' ■ ' 




N 


* of /^fitffit 


gjg 


^V ^ j^ >> '''"S 


i-^^A 




'*' . i*i!>&. '' ~. »i 



I IRS I HOCKl V II AM - i '^.^-1964 
Back Rozi-. T. L. .MacDonald, D. J. McQuaie, R. S. Chanrler, I. H. Parker, R. AV. Scheel. 
Middle R(r^-. B. K. Hillarv, Esq., J. D. Ledingham, R. P. Wennberg, A. P. D. Gamble, 

G. R. Garton, .\I. G. Pankhurst. 
Front Ron-: R. B. Southam, B. G. Allmark. R. .M. L. Smallian, Capt., R. J. Stansbury, 

Vice-Capt., B. J. Berry, G. B. Keflfer. 
Absent: I. R. Sinclair. 



36 THE ASHBU Rl AN 

George Keffer— George, a real husrler improved greatly this year and 
was always a threat when on the ice. The next team that George 
plays for will benefit greatly from his aggressive play. 

Rick Wennberg— "Berg" when not knocking opposing players down 
(and picking himself oif the ice) played a very aggressive type of 
hockey. 

Graham Gartox— "Toe" when on the ice threw his weight around well. 
Best of luck in varsity hockey. 

Tom Macdonald— Tom, as a member of the "Kid" line had an excellent 
game against Hillfield. Although not having very much ice time 
throughout the season he should be a mainstay of next year's team. 

Bruce Berry— Bruce ("Elbows") had a very good season this year. His 
play-making ability and stylish skating should make him the back- 
bone of next year's team. 

Rick South am— Rick took over as first string goalie and turned in many 
great performances during the year. 

Bob Scheel— Bob improved immensely from the first of the year. 
Should be a great assistance to next year's team. 

Iax Parker— lan's skating and shooting, although not the best on the 
team, showed great improvement throughout the year. Great po- 
tential for next year. 

Sandy Sinclair- Sandy played his best game against Stanstead although 
the team did not produce enough goals to win. Sandy was always 
eager and willing. 

Don AIcQuaig— Don surprised everyone with his ability on Defence. 
His "heads up" style of play obtained many spectacular goals for 
him. 

Boh Chantler— Bob played excellently throughout the season. Al- 
though it was his first year on defence he became ver\' much 
respected because of his hard body checks. 

Dave Gambee— "Sass" once again showed his prowess at stickhandlin^, 
shooting and skating. He Mas the backbone of the defence this 
and next year should be the best in the league. 

Leadingham - Fankhursi— iMany thanks to the managers this vcar for 
doing an excellent job. 

The team extends its thanks to .Mr. Hillary for all the rime and effort 
he put into coaching us this year. 



THE AS H B U Rl A N 



31 



SKIING 

Mr. Bernasconi produced w fine ski team. A good skier himself, 
with excellent coaching al)i!it\-, he had pretty fair material to work with. 
This was a happv combination. 

Part of the training program inckided one evening each week of 
night skiing at Camp Fortune (the hovs did their prep during regular 
games time). 

Our first Meet at Lake Placid was in competition with a latere num- 
ber of U.S. High School teams. \\ c were entered as a guest team and 
our times were not tabulated; however the experience was most valuable. 

Following this we had a two-way Aleet against Northwood. Here 
the honours were divided as Northwood won the Slalom, and we won 
the Cross CountrN*. 



FIRST SKI TEAM — 1963-1964 
Winners of the Cochand and Price Trophies 

Back Rozi-. R. Bernasconi, Esq., D. A. Hayley, R. N. Tifft, B. L. O'Brien. 
Front Roil-: C. L. Collyer, A. W. Anderson, \'icc-Capt., R. ^^^ Horner, Capt., C. H. C. 
Grant, \'ice-Capr., H. B. Ewing. 







38 



THE ASH B U RI AN 



We next travelled to the Eastern Townships for the Tri-School Meet 
against B.C.S. and Stanstead. We won comfortably with B.C.S. coming 
second and Stanstead third. In this meet O'Brien was awarded the Price 
Trophy, given to the best skier of the day. 

The Cochand Trophy is held by the best ski team of Ashbury, 
B.C.S. and L.C.C. This trophy was in the possession of L.C.C. who w^re 
unable to be present at the Tri-School Meet. Arrangements were there- 
fore made for a Meet to be held at Sedbergh with Ashbury, L.C.C. and 
Sedbergh competing. We were again the victors, but by the narrowest 
of margins over L.C.C, thereby gaining the Cochand Trophy. Our w^in 
was due largely to a team effort in the Slalom (we placed four men in the 
first six), and to Grant's fine win in the Cross Country. 

Finally in the Dalton Wood Meet at Camp Fortune we were placed 
4th out of the 14 competing high schools. As one of our better skiers 
was unable to take part, this was a good showing. 



CURLING 

Curling was played by a nucleus of boys in the Winter term. This 
was a new departure and had a small but enthusiatic following under the 
leadership of S. Cartman. 

Four rinks were drawn up and their teams curled every Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday at the Curlodrome in Lansdowne Park. 
Although time was limited to an hour's play, usually the boys managed 
to take in five or six ends of play. 



FIRST TEAM HOCKEY RESULTS 



ASHBURY 


vs. 


EASTVIEW 


6-1 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


NORTHWOOD 


5-2 


W^on 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


NORTHWOOD 


3-1 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


LA SALLE 


5-4 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


STANSTEAD 


4-6 


Lost 


Away 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


ST. PAT'S H.S. 


1-3 


Lost 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


HILLCRESTH.S. 


3-1 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


BROOKFIELD H.S. 


4-3 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


L.C.C. 


1-2 


Lost 


H ome 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


LISGAR 


5-0 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


iMacDONALD H.S. 


1-0 


Won 


Awav 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


.MacDONALD H.S. 


5-3 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


BISHOP'S 


2-4 


Lost 


.\\vay 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


FISHER PARK 


0-2 


Lost 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


HILLFIELD SCHOOL 


3-1 


Won 


Home 


ASHBURY 


vs. 


OLD BOY'S 


5-7 


Lost 


Home 



Won 10, Lost 6, Goal for: 53, Against: 40 



THE ASH B U Rl AN 



39 



BASKETBALL 







G 




W 




L 








13 




8 




5 








SCORING 










G 




fs 


fsa 


fsifi 




pts 


Haddad 


11 




64 


66 


40 




168 


Reid 


13 




64 


44 


20 




148 


Mulaner 


13 




37 


35 


15 




89 


Riddell 


13 




30 


19 


8 




68 


Sveinson 


13 




16 


20 


12 




44 


Shaw 


13 




3 


7 


3 




9 


Cotton 


11 




2 


6 







4 


Heenev 


13 




1 










2 



PtF 
532 



524 

REBOUNDS 

Mulaner _ 129 

Reid 94 

Haddad 55 

Riddell 38 

Shaw 14 

Sveinson .„ 8 

Cotton 5 

Shoup 1 




FIRST BASKETBALL TEA.M — 1963-1964 
Back Roii\ D. A. Shaw, P. R. Shoup, B. J. Heenev, A. J. Sark. 
Front Ron-: A. Reid, B. H. Haddad, Vice-Capt., D. J. Mulaner, Capt., D. G. Sveinson, 

E. A. Riddell. 
Absent: J. M. Cotton. 



40 



THE ASH B U RIAN 



CRICKET 

The first XI had a poor season as far as the results are concerned. 
No game was won, but as usual the opposition were mostly experienced 
adult players. In the school games with Bishop's College School the 
batting proved to be fragile, but at times both the bowling and fielding 
were of a respectable standard. The School's attack improved as the 
season progressed, and it was a great pity that the batting did not advance 
commensurately. Cricket is primarily a batsman's game and a side must 
score enough runs for the attack to have a chance of getting the opposi- 
tion out for a lower total. This truism was especially evident in the 
game at home against B.C.S. 

Most of the side will be back in school next season, and if this year's 
experience matures the School will do much better next Spring. 

Colours were re-awarded to G. Samples and R. Southam (Wicket- 
keeper), and awarded to McQuaig, \A^ennberg and Taschereau. 



FIRST CRICKET TEAM — 1963-1964 
Back Row. D. A. Spry, R. P. Wennberg, R. B. Southam, J. R. Dodds, G. R. V. Benskin. 
Front Row. C. L. Collyer, G. M. Samples, C. P. Roberts, Vice-Capt., B. J. Cooper, Capt., 

M. A. Taschereau, D. J. McQuaig. 
In Front: C. B. H. Stone. 






' JSl i 







0", 




^ 



V H E A S H B U KI AN 



41 



Swirinary of results: 

April 25th r New Edinburgh. Lost by 7 wickets. 
School: 80 for 9 declared (Roberts 15) 
N.E.: 99 for 5 

April 2 1st I' Defence C.C. Lost by 6 wickets. 
School: 70 (Benskin 18 n.o.) 
D.C.C.: 141 for 5 

ALi\' 2nd r Kingston C.C. Drawn 
K.C.C.:'l43 for 7 dec. (Samples 4 for 43 ) 
School: 1 13 for 4 (Mr. Batts 51 n.o,, .Mr. I iancock 41 n.o.) 

Ma\- 9th r Brockville C.C. Cancelled 

May 10th v Coral Reef C.C. Lost bv 5 runs. 
C.R.C.C.: 77 for 7 dec. (Samples 5 for 14) 
School: 72 (Mr. Batts 41) 

Ma\- 16th V Bishop's College School. Lost by 10 wickets. 
School: 46 (Southam 1^) and 59 for 8 (Wennberu 30) 
B.C.S.: 109 for 7 (McQuaig 3 for 18) 

May 2 3rd r Bishop's College School. Lost by 6 wickets. 
School: '28 and 1 1 (Dodds 6) " 
B.C.S.: 64 (Taschereau 4 for 24, Samples 3 for 18) 

May 25th v The Staff. Match Drawn. 



Staff Imi'mgs: 
Mr. Anderson 
Mr. Black 
Mr. Pemberton 
Mr. Batts 
The Headmaster 
Mr. Sinclair 
Mr. Varent 
Mr. Bernasconi 
Mr. Hancock 
Mr. Morgan 
Mr. \^incent 
Extras 

School Innings: 

Southam 

W'ennberg 

Roberts 

Dodds 

Cooper (Capt. ) 

Benskin 

Samples 

Extras 



Caught Cooper, Bowled Taschereau 

Bowled Taschereau 

Run out 

Not out 

Caught and Bowled Samples 

Caught Cooper, Bowled Samples 

Bowled McQuaig 

Did not bat 

Did not bat 

Did not bat 

Not out 

declared for 6 wickets 



(H) 
(H) 
(H) 



(H) 
(H) 



(A) 
(H) 



Caught Mr. Bernasconi, Bowled Mr. Hancock 

Not out 

Stumped, Bowled Mr. Hancock 

Caught Mr. Sinclair, Bo\yled Mr. TLincock 

Bowled Mr. [Lincock 

Stumped, Bo\yled Mr. Batts 

Not out 

TOTAL 



16 
9 
2 
50 
11 





TOTAL 93 



6 

25 

8 

14 

12 



1 

1 

67 



42 THEASHBURIAN 

CHARACTERS OF THE FIRST XI 

Cooper, B. (capt.): He had a poor season with the bat and this under- 
mined his confidence. He had a difficult task in the field with the 
limited resources of the first attack. 

Roberts, C. P. (vice-captain): His cricket was rather disappointing 
throughout the term, but he was administratively efficient. 

SouTHAM, R.: Potentially he has the makings of a sound left-hand open- 
ing bat but at the moment lacks the concentration. An indifferent 
wicket-keeper. 

Samples G.: He has been the most consistent wicket-taker in the side. 
His left-arm spin is unusual in that the "Chinaman" appears to be his 
stock ball. His inaccurate spells are costly. 

Wennberg, R.: His attacking qualities were needed in the team in which 
not enough batsmen hit the ball hard. As the season advanced his 
increased watchfulness made him the most successful batsman. 

Taschereau, M.: A left-arm seamer who improved rapidly with confi- 
dence. He has the ability to move the ball through the air consis- 
tently, and is very conscious about length. 

Collyer, C: His right-arm medium-pace deliveries caused quite some 
discomfort to the opposition; latterly however he became inaccurate 
and too easily dispirited. A comfortable No. 1 1 in the batting 
order. 

McQuAiG, D.: His bowling improved with persistence. For a medium- 
pace bowler too many deliveries went innocuously wide down the 
leg side. Sheer determination brought him many wickets. A good 
fielder. 

Benskin, G.: An unorthodox left-hand batsman, his record was poorer 
than necessary. He must learn to use his feet to get to the pitch 
of the ball. A useful fielder. 

DoDDS:, J.: Another left-hander who delights to hit the ball hard. At 
the moment he lacks many fundamentals, but has time on his side. 
His cheerful disposition and accurate throwing were useful con- 
tributions in the field. 

Spry: A safe fielder whose batting flattered only to deceive. 

J.S.B. 



T HE AS H B U Rl AN 








43 






FIRST XI AVERAGES 










Bowling 










Overs 


Maidens 


Runs 


Wickets 


Average 


Tasclicrcau 


25 


5 


78 


8 


9.7 


Samples 


65.2 


10 


212 


20 


10.6 


AlcQuaig 


44 


14 


121 


7 


17.3 


Collver 


41 


9 


137 


5 


27.4 




B 


\rriNG (Qualification 


30 runs) 








Innings 


Not Out 


Runs 


Highest Score 


Average 


Wennberg 


8 


1 


80 


■0 


11.4 


Dodds 


6 





36 


14 


6.0 


Cooper 


9 





55 


15 


5.8 


Samples 


8 


1 


32 


10 


5.3 


Southam 


8 





41 


17 


5.1 



SECOND XI CRICKET 

The Under- 16 XI had a fair season, though they only \\on one o^amt. 
Under the watchful eye of Mr. A. J. Hancock there was much enthusiasm 
displayed and next year's prospects are bright. 

V Sedbergh (H) — Draw 

Sedbergh: 89 (Dyson 3 for 5, .Millar 2 for 14) 
Schooh 82 for 9 '(Lawson 34, Polk 28). 

V Bishop's College School (A) — Lost 

B.S.C.: 70 (Pyefinch 7 for 24) and 43 (Pyefinch 5 for 12) 
School: 56 and 15. 

V Sedbergh (A) — \\'on 

Sedbergh: 50 (.Millar 5 for 34) and 46 (.Millar 7 for 8) 
Schooir38 (.Millar 13) and 69 (Pyefinch 31) 

V Bishop's College School (H) —Lost 

B.C.S.: 62 (Pyefinch 3 for 18) and 16 (.Millar 2 for 7) 
School: 37 (O'Neill 10) and 39 (O'Neill 11). 

UNDER 16 CRICKET TEA.M — 1963-1964 
Back Row. A. J. Hancock, Esq., J. .M. Mulaner, R. H. Hall-Brooks, O. K. Lawson, D. H. 

Alaclaren, R. J. .Millar, J. H. Smellie, R. K. Souch, P. G. Dvson. 
Fro?Jt Roiv: J. A. Kenny, H. B. O'Neill, C. T. Chown, H. J.Pyefinch, Capt., T. \V. I. 

Cumming. D. C. Polk, L. H. .Moquette. 






1* n 




M U 



TRACK 1 I X w ■;-i964 

Back Roiv: C. B. Munro, J. M. Robinson, W. 1 . AlacKenzie, R. W. Scheel. 
Middle Ron-. R. D. Olson, T. K. Campbell, D. J. Alulaner, R. B. .McNair, K. Nixon, 

R. P. Rossy. 
Front Row: R. S. Saunders, A. W. Currie, P. C. Hunt, Co-Capt., B. K. Hillary, Esq., 

G. B. KefFer, Co-Capt., G. B. Livingstone, G. Resnik. 



ATHLETICS 

Athletics continues to suffer from the demands of examinations on 
the boys' time. This term, however, with the aid of kind weather the 
Track team coached by Mr. Hillary was very busy and attended several 
outside meets. A number of creditable performances were recorded by 
individuals. The Field competitors under the guidance of Mr. Black 
also produced good individual results. 

As usual the School Sports were rushed into the last few days of 
term rather unsatisfactorily, June 4th and 5th. The results were: 



PRIZE LIST 
TRACK AND FIELD SPORTS 

1. HIGH JUMP— THE READ TROPHY 

Senior — D. Alulaner — 5'5" 
Intermediate — G. B. Robinson I — 4'7|" 

2. THE MILE— THE GORDON FISCHEL TROPHY 

First— G. B. Keflfer- 5'7i" 
Second — R. Rossv 

3. THE JUNIOR MILE— G. Resnik— 6'10" 

4. THROWING THE CRICKET BALL 

Senior — G. E. Raymond — 91 yds. 2'2i" 
Intermediate— J. R. Dodds — 84 yds. r5" 
Junior— R. J. Millar— 83 yds. O'isi" 



T HE ASH B U R IAN 4^ 

5. RROAI) JUMP 

Senior— P. C. Hunt— 19'2i" 
Intcrnicdiiite — C. Collyer — 17'8" 
Junior— W. H. B. Caiin— H'9" 

6. DISCUS 

Senior— D. .Mulaner I— 98'2l" 
Intermediate — D. A. P. Ciamble — 96'3i" 

7. JAVELIN 

Senior — D. Mulaner — \ST\" 
Intermediate — G. R. Benskin — 115'H" 

8. SHOT PUT 

Senior— R. B. McNair— 34'2" 
Intermediate — P. E. MacPhail 
Junior— L. \. H. McAninch— 39'11|" (A New Record) 

9. 100 YARDS— MRS. M. FAUQUIER TROPHY 

Senior— G. B. Keffer— 10.6" 
Intermediate — C. CoIIver — 10.6" 
Junior — W. H. Cann — 12.5" 

10. 220 YARDS— DR. C. K. ROWAN-LEGG TROPHY 

Senior — G. B. Keffer — 24.5" 
Intermediate — W. T. Mackenzie — 25.7" 
Junior — L. \'. H. McAninch — 26.7" 

11. 440 YARDS— THE OLD BOYS' CUP 

Senior — C. H. C. Grant — 57" 
Intermediate — R. W. Scheel — 58.5" 

12. 880 YARDS— THE BEARDMORE TROPHY 

Senior — C. H. C. Grant — 2'25" 
Intermediate — R. Rossy — 2'28.7" 

13. THE IXTERHOUSE RELAY RACES 

Senior — Alexander 
Intermediate — 
Junior — W'oollcombe 

B. THE CROSS COUNTRY RACES 

SENIOR- THE ROBERTS ALLAN CUP 
First — A. W. Anderson 
Second — H. R. Campbell 
Third — G. B. Livingstone 

INTERMEDLATE— THE IR\ INE CUP 

First — AI. G. Pankhurst 
Second — T. Campbell 

JUNIOR— O. K. Lawson 

UNDER 11— R. L.Wilson 



THE PROFESSOR J. B. EWING TROPHY FOR THE 
MOST VALUABLE ME.MBER OF THE TRACK TEAM 

G. B. Keffer 



46 



THE ASHBURIAN 



The House competition resulted in a win for Connaught. Details: 
WILSON SHIELD RESULTS- 1963-1964 



Event 


House 


Points 


Senior Soccer 


Connaught 


25 


Intermediate Soccer 


Woollcombe 


15 


junior Soccer 


Alexander 


10 


Cross-country 


Connaught 


10 


Senior Hockey 


Connaught 


25 


Intermediate Hockey 


Connaught 


7i 




Woollcombe 


7i 


Junior Hockey 


Alexander 


10 


Senior Cricket 


Connaught 


25 


Intermediate Cricket 


Connaught 


15 


Junior Cricket 


Alexander 




Track and Field Senior 


Alexander 


25 


Junior School Academic 


Alexander 


20 



Final Placings: 



Alexander — 65 — 2nd 
Connaught — lO?! — 1st 
Woollcombe — 22i — 3rd 



The Gym Team continues to flourish and was on view at a Parents' 
Reception as well as at the Cadet Inspection. 

THE GYM TEAM — 1963-1964 
Back Row. P. R. Thurston, A. J. Waxman, J. H. Steenbakkers, G. R. V. Benskin. 
Front Row. J. A. Blaumann, C, T. B. Johnston, Capt., R. J. Anderson, Esq., K. H. Rawley. 
Absent: W. M. Southam. 







THE ASH B U Rl AN 



41 



CROSS COUNTRY' 

The races were run again in the fall with 209 bov'S entering the 
four races. This is very good participation. Of these, 94 boys made 
points for their houses, 1 5 more than the previous year. 

Alexander 
H 



Total Points: 
Under 11 
Junior 

Intermediate 
Senior 
Total 



11 

5 

9 
26i 



Winners 
Under 11: 



1) Wilson IV 

2) Prvde 

3) AlacDonald III 



9.05 



Connaught 

5i 
9 

17 
28 
59i 

Intermediate: 



VVoollcombe 
5 
14 
15 
15 
49 



DPankhurst 

2) Campbell II 

3) Rossv I 



Junior: 



1) Lawson 

2) Day I 

3) Resnick II 



Senior: 



1 ) Anderson 

2) Campbell I 

3) Livingstone 



21.30 



25.23 




Note: In case vou wonder why the Hockey, Ski and Basketball players are not in their 
team uniforms, the answer is quite simple: the lens on the photographer's camera failed 
to function, no doubt because he was not using w inter oil. 



48 T H E ASH B U R I AN 

CLOSING CEREMONY 

This year's ceremony, the seventy-third in the history of the School, 
took place in warm sunshine on Saturday, 6th June. The usual Leaving 
Service for the graduating students in the Chapel was conducted by the 
School Chaplains at 9.30 a.m., after which the whole School assembled 
in the Quadrangle for the Prize Giving. 

The Chairman of the Board of Governors, Commodore \\\ G. Ross, 
R.C.N., in his opening remarks paid tribute to the School Staff, dwelt 
briefly on the future of Cadet Training at Ashbury, and finally, and most 
sis^nificantly, spoke of the increase in fees. This, he said coupled with 
the appeal for a $650,000 development programme which will provide 
for construction of a separate Junior School building with residence 
accommodation for forty and classroom space for one hundred. Under 
this scheme there will be a new gymnasium-auditorium, improved locker, 
games and hobby rooms. The Chairman said that D. Cargill Southam 
was to be general chairman of this development fund and that world- 
wide campaigning was in hand through the latter's committee of Old 
Boys. 

The Headmaster then made his comments on the school year. He 
spoke first of the deaths of those who were associated with the school, 
particularly of the loss of a School Prefect, A. G. S. Podhradsky. He 
went on to thank the members of Staff, school officials and Mothers' 
Guild for their continued support. Quoting some of the examination 
results he thought that the year had been a good one academically. 
Finally the Headmaster reasserted the objectives of the School, the 
values which Ashbury attempts to inculcate. 

D. B. AIcGaughey as Captain of the School then gave the X'aledic- 
tory address, and immediately afterwards presented the Headmaster with 
a painting on behalf of the Graduating Class. 

The major speech of the afternoon was given by the High Commis- 
sioner for New Zealand, His Excellency J. S. Reid. He addressed the 
graduating class primarily, but his timely remarks had significance for 
parents, students, and teaching staff alike. He suggested that much of 



Photographs on page 49 — from top left to right: Parents and friends at the Closing; Old 
Boy Robert Darby presents Chemistry prize to W. J. Booth; His Excellency \V. A. 
Rose of Trinidad awards Form I prize to son Peter; The Guest Speaker, His 
Kxcellency J. S. Reid of New Zcaalnd; .Merid Birou of Ethiopia receives Cadet award 
from Donald Maclaren; Mrs. Stuart MacKay-Smith presents the Grade 12 Rowlcv 
liootii Cup to G. B. KefFer of Sioux Lookout; G. R. Garton receives the Governor 
(ieneraTs Medal from His Excellency J. S. Reid; Blair (iilmour presents the Fleming 
Cup to Christopher Cirant; The Headmaster presents his Intermediate Trophy to 
(). K. Eawson of Sault Ste. Marie; Head Boy D. B. McCJaughey being awarded the 
Nelson Shield by Blair Gilmour; D. A. F. Spry receives the Best Officer award from 
Donald Maclaren. 



1 



,^5f4 ''»*-^'' -s^e ^ >■ 









so THEASHBURIAN 

our education is, perhaps mistakenly, "devoted towards developing 
qualities of leadership"; for although leaders are needed, "men of out- 
standing character and great ability who can guide and stimulate the 
rest of us to greater efforts and new achievements", many of us neither 
win prizes nor become leaders. He went on to ask whether the alter- 
native to this, unthinking following of an established leader, was good 
enough for a graduating Ashburian, and suggested that home and school 
would ensure that his present audience was not in that class of follower. 
No, the instruction of school life was about to be replaced for the 
graduates by "the Halls of Learning" whether they be universities, 
professions or businesses. 'WW the accumulated knowledge and wisdom 
of the race is available." For this a deal of self-discipline would be 
required, for school discipline breaks down in an adult society, but there 
were rewards to be gained, and here many of the better graduates would 
make their mark. These people were not leaders in the accepted sense 
but a nonetheless valuable second level of society who have no desire to 
lead or no talent for directing others. This role was difficult, suggested 
the speaker, for his audience with its background and training, because 
the students were registered as citizens of a free democracy and also 
members of a Protestant Christian Church. Those who tried to uphold 
this role would meet tremendous pressures for conformity and quite 
severe social penalties for independence of mind. His Excellency re- 
called some of the challenges he had experienced in political service in 
countries which were not democratic nor indeed Christian. He stressed 
that parents and communities spent vast amounts of money not only to 
ensure that students were able to make a living but also to help them 
become good citizens. The traditions of school such as Ashbury de- 
manded the highest possible; . . . "an acceptance of full responsibility 
for opinions and beliefs, acceptance of our share, and more than our 
share, of the work, honesty and courage of our convictions, especially 
when we are in the minority." To be in the front row of the second 
grade, he concluded, is a worthy and challenging goal for the majority 
of students because after all there is not much room at the top. In a 
society where there was not much "room at the top", he concluded that 
to be in the front row of the second grade would be a worthy and chal- 
lenging goal for the majority of students. 

The presentations of academic prizes followed His Excellency's 
speech. The Headmaster introduced the distinguished visitors to per- 
form this: His Excellency W. A. Rose, High Commissioner for Trinidad 
and Tobago; Major-General W. A. B. Anderson, O.B.E., CD., Adju- 
tant-General Canadian Army; R. W. G. Darby Esq., B.A., .M.Ed., 
Vice-Principal of Ridgemont High School, Ottawa; and Donald Mac- 
laren Esq., Vice-Chairman of the Board of Governors. 

The Alemorial Prizes, Athletic Trophies, and Special Awards were 
presented by the President of the Old Boys' Association, Blair S. Gil- 



TH E AS H B U Rl AN si 

niour. The Charles Rowley Booth Memorial Trophy was presented by 
.Mrs. Stuart Mackay-Sniith. The Guest Speaker awarded The Gover- 
nor-General's Medal to G. R. Garton. 

The Closing Remarks were made by the Chairman, after which the 
parents moved to the front lawns and the refreshment tents. Music was 
provided by the Band of the Governor-General's Foot Guards. The 
School Year was at its end. 

The Prize-Winners were as follows: 



PRIZE LIST 

A. FORM PRIZES FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY 

IC _ C. G. TENCH \y W. H. B. CANN 

IB N.G.CR ASTON iv\ „_ _ N SIMS 

lA _. V. BEGA.MUDRE y V. STEENBAKKERS 

II =::=::r A^ iTo^SSd ;;;^ — ^- ^ ^3^^^^;^^^ 

IIIC D. C. VENNOR-.MORRIS ^ ^^ "• ^- "-"^ljuau 

IIIB D. A. H. AIACFARLANE ^IC B. L. DEACON 

IIIA R. A. ESPAILLAT VIB D. A. REID 

TRANSITUS B .__. P. AIICHELSON \1A G. B. KEEPER 

TRANSITUS A .__._. A. FARRUGIA UPPER VI _ G. R. GARTON 



B. A\\'ARDS OF MERIT 

I— DALTON PRIZE P. A. ROSE 

I— DALTON PRIZE _. G. BAXTER 

I— DALTON PRIZE (Writing) \'. BEGA.MUDRE 

I— DALTON PRIZE (Progress) .- J. R. ELLIS 

II— BLACK PRIZE (Hard Work) G. HAYLEY 

II— BLACK PRIZE (French) BRIAN WILSON 

II— BLACK PRIZE (History and Geography) ROBERT WILSON 

II— BLACK PRIZE (Progress) M. L. W. BARNES 

IIIC— SINCLAIR PRIZE G. D. BLYTH 

IIIB— .MORGAN PRIZE . A. A. RINCON 

IIIA— SPENCER PRIZE M. H. ELLIS 

TRANSITUS B— ATTWELL PRIZE W. HARSH 

TRANSITUS A— POLK PRIZE D. R. MOULDS 

JUNIOR SCHOOL— .MOTHERS' GUILD PRIZE (Improvement in French) 

A. D. GOW 

I\'_.MONKS PRIZE G. RESNIK 

I\A— X'INCENT PRIZE S. DAY 

\-_BATTS PRIZE _ M. G. PANKHURST 

\' A— BLACK PRIZE .._ A. G. PATTON 

.MIDDLE SCHOOL— .MOTHERS' GUILD PRIZE (Improvement in English) 

A. G. PATTON 

\'ID— dc \'ARENT PRIZE „ G. E. SIG\ALDASON 



^2 THEASHBURIAN 

\1C— HANCOCK PRIZE . T. CAMPBELL 

\'IB— PE.MBERTON PRIZE .- - R. D. WILSON 

\IA— MARLAND PRIZE _ - C. H. C. GRANT 

UPPER \'I— BRAIN PRIZE . ._ D. B. McGAUGHEY 

C. THE HONOUR ACADEMIC PRIZES 
MIDDLE SCHOOL CLASSES 

THE SNELGROVE PRIZE FOR MATHS & SCIENCE . T. W. I. GUMMING 

THE DE\ INE PRIZE FOR LATIN _ ... R. H. HALL-BROOKS 

THE JOBLING PRIZE FOR FRENCH ..._ R. H. HALL-BROOKS 

D. JUNIOR MATRICULATION CLASSES 

THE A. B. BELCHER MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR ENGLISH 

G. B. KEFFER 
THE ROBERT MOORE MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR ENGLISH 

B. JOHNSTON 
THE ADAM PODHRADSKY MEiMORIAL PRIZE FOR MODERN HISTORY 

T. L. MACDONALD 

THE BLACK PRIZE FOR MODERN HISTORY J. FISHER 

THE BRAIN PRIZES FOR ANCIENT HISTORY B. L. DEACON 

H. B. HADDAD 

THE PROFESSOR J. B. EWING PRIZE FOR ALGEBRA G. B. KEFFER 

THE DR. O. J. FIRESTONE PRIZE FOR ALGEBRA G. D. SAIITH 

THE MARLAND PRIZE FOR GEOMETRY P. R. THURSTON 

THE MONKS PRIZE FOR GEOMETRY R. L. LASH 

THE SNELGROVE PRIZES FOR PHYSICS B. L. DEACON 

H. B. HADDAD 

THE SIBLEY PRIZES FOR CHEMISTRY .... W. BOOTH 

D. M. ATACK 

THE READ LATIN PRIZE K. AI. COOK 

THE F. E. B. WHITFIELD PRIZE FOR LATIN H. B. O'NEILL 

THE FIORENZA DREW PRIZES FOR FRENCH H. B. O'NEILL 

J. D. FISHER 
THE PEMBERTON PRIZE FOR GEOGRAPHY J. G. MACLAREN 

SENIOR MATRICULATION PRIZES 

THE HON. GEORGE DREW PRIZE FOR ENGLISH G. R. GARTON 

THE ASHBURY COLLEGE PRIZE FOR MATHEMATICS 

G. R. GARTON 

THE L. H. SIBLEY PRIZE FOR SCIENCE H. R. CAMPBELL 

THE L. H. SIBLEY PRIZE FOR ZOOLOGY D. M. ATACK 

THE ANGUS FRENCH PRIZE G. R. GARTON 

E. THE WOODBURN MUSIC PRIZES 

FORM I ... G. BAXTER 

FORM II _ D. W. HATCH 

FORM IIIC I. C. MERKLEY 

FORM IIIA/B _ D. A. H. MACFARLANE 

\\ P. Hl.ARNE 
FORM IRANSITUS J. R. N. TYAS 

F. THE WOODS ART PRIZES 

FORM IIIC R. L. BISSONNET 

FORM IIIA/B „ „ A. I. RINCON 

lORM IRANSITUS \. D. COW 



THE ASH B U li I A .V 53 

G. THE CHOIR PRIZES 

THE L. H. SIBLKV PRIZES _ P. (.,. I.OFTUS 

P. \I. McGUFF 

H. THE PUBLIC SPEAKING PRIZES 

THI CHARLES C.MJ- PRIZE — JUNIOR A. FARRUGIA 

THE ROSS McAIASTER PRIZES — SENIOR R. A. LASH 

H. B. EWING 

I. THE POETRY READING PRIZES 

THE A. B. BELCHER PRIZES — SENIOR R. I.. I. ASH 

A. J. SARK 
THE C. G. DRAYTON PRIZED — JUNIOR 

I. G. C. BRODIE-BROCKWELL 
P. VV. H. OSMOND 

J. THE CADET PRIZES 

THE COMMANDING OFFICERS PRIZE C/MAJ. A. W. ANDERSON 

THE MOST \ALCABLE OFFICERS PRIZE C/CAPT. D. SPRY 

THE BEST N'.C.O. PRIZES C/S/M M. BIROC 

C/SGT. T. M. MACDONALD 

THE MOST PROMISING RECRUIT J. T. WEIR 

THE BAND AWARD C/SGT. I. H. PARKER 

K. THE ATHLETIC PRIZES 

THE TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS 

JUNIOR — THE ALWYN CUP W. H. B. CANN 

INTERMEDIATE — THE STANLEY WRIGHT CUP 

D. A. P. GAMBLE 

SENIOR — THE FLEMING CUP C. H. C. GRANT 

THE MACCORDICK CUP (Greatest Contribution to School Games) 

D. MULANER 

THE CONNAUGHT CUP FOR GYAI B. JOHNSTON 

THE E. B. PILGRIM TROPHY (Long Distance Running) A. W. ANDERSON 
THE WILSON SHIELD FOR INTERHOUSE COMPETITION 

CONNAUGHT HOUSE 

L. SPECIAL AWARDS 

THE WOODS JUNIOR SCHOOL AWARD OF MERIT A. FARRUGIA 

THE SOUTH AM CUP (The Best Record in Scholarship & Sports- 

Junior Matriculation) G. B. KEFFER 

THE NELSON SHIELD _ . . D. B. McGAUGHEY 

i\I. THE HEADMASTER'S TROPHIES 

JUNIOR _ A. D. GOW 

INTERMEDIATE „ O. K. LAW SON 

SENIOR „ R. L. LASH 

N. THE C. ROWLEY BOOTH MEMORIAL TROPHY 

G. B. KFFFFR 

O. THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S MEDAL 

G. R. GARTON 



$4 T H E ASH BU RI AN 

HEADMASTERS' CONFERENCE 

The Twenty-Ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Head- 
masters' Association was held at St, Andrew's College, Aurora during 
the first week of January 1964. All eighteen member schools were 
represented by their headmasters. 

President of the Association and Chairman for the Meeting was 
Mr. Robert Coulter, Headmaster of St. Andrew's. 

During the morning service in the School Chapel, a brass tablet, a 
tribute from his fellow headmasters, was unveiled and dedicated to the 
memory of the late Kenneth Ketchum, formerly Headmaster of St. 
Andrew's. 

In addition to the regular business meetings the Conference was 
addressed by Mr. Donald M. Graham, Director of Education, Forest 
Hill Village, Toronto and Dr. J. R. H. Morgan, Director, The Ontario 
Curriculum Institute, Toronto. 

Representing the Ashbury Board of Governors at the Closing 
Dinner was iVlr. Frank D. Bliss of Hamilton. 

The executive for the coming year consists of: Mr. G. W. Smith, 
Lakefield Preparatory School, President; Mr. E. C. Cayley, Stanstead, 
Vice-President; Mr. H. M. Beer, Pickering College, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Mr. R. H. Perry, Ashbury College, Recording Secretary, 

The 1965 Conference will be held at Lakefield Preparatory School 
with A4r. G. W. Smith presiding. 



^0^=0 



ASHBURY SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS- 1964 

Juniors— Macfarlane, McRuer, Emmons II, Bissonnet, Firestone, Davis, 
Vennor-M orris, Espaillat II, Farrugia, AlacDonaid III, Merkley II. 

Seniors— Sims, Deacon, Day, Cook, K., Chown, Dobinson I, Lawson, 
Shaw, Hall-Brooks, AlacPhail, Waters, A\'ennbcr(T, M, 



TH E ASH B U Rl AN JS 

SCIENCE NOTES 

1. The visit to the National Research Council, 2nd, March. 

We arrived at the N.R.C building in Sussex Drive punctually and 
made our way to the Division of Applied Biology. Our host, Dr. D. C. 
Mortimer, gave us a delightfully humorous talk about some of his work 
with radio isotopes in Plant Physiology, and yet his manner indicated 
the earnest approach typical of his kind. 

The highly instrumented work of Cosmic Rays and High Energ)^ 
Particle Physics Deparmient bore a contrast. We were very interested 
to see the impressive particle accelerator, and a little dazed at the com- 
plexity of the computing section which was still analysing the data 
obtained from the Canadian satelhte, Alouette I. Part of the instru- 
mental section was destined for the 1965 Alouette II, and was available 
for our inspection from a respectful distance. 

In the afternoon, after a pleasant luncheon, we visited the National 
Aeronautical Establishment at Uplands. The mammoth wind tunnel 
was exciting, even in its silent presence, and the facts and figures con- 
cerning its operation were impressive indeed. 

2. The visit to Chalk River Atomic Ejiergy Research Plant, 31st, March. 

The early morning drive to Chalk River was pleasant, and set the 
tone for an absorbing tour. Dr. D. A. Keys, a pioneer of Atomic 
Energy research in Canada, welcomed us and gave a comprehensive, but 
always relevant, lecture illustrated by apt experiments and slides. 

Wt examined scale models of XRX and NRU, the atomic piles used 
for fundamental research, and then the actual devices themselves. The 
highly elaborate control rooms were a feature to be remembered; their 
cleanliness and efficiency took the eye. One felt untroubled about the 
great energy potential available in the reactors from the point of view of 
safetv% but impressed at its possibilities. This feeling bodes well for 
the young scientists who made the trip. 

A.J.H. 



'G^^.O 



5^ T H E ASH BU RI AN 

SENIOR SCHOOL 
POETRY-READING COMPETITION 

Both the senior and intermediate classes of this competition were 
poorly supported this year, and one unseasonal May Sunday morning 
after Chapel live candidates competed for the two prizes before a meagre 
audience. 

In the opening senior section the boys read a poem of their own 
choice. Grant in his plummy and sombre voice recalled "The Destruc- 
tion of Sennacherib" in Byron's words; Lash read Gibson's "Flannan 
Isle" sensitively; and Ewing, showing a pleasing awareness of his audi- 
ence, narrated W. B. Yeats' "The Ballad of Fox Hunter". The set 
piece of verse was T. S. Eliot's "Macavity the Mystery Cat". Neither 
Grant nor E\\ ing conveyed any trace of the poem's absurd humour, 
and Lash was too serious by far. No one found a suitable pace for the 
reading, although this was a prepared poem. Finally, each of them had 
a few minutes to look at Sassoon's "Rearguard" before reading from the 
stage. Grant amply stressed the grimness of the content, but it was 
Lash who read most successfully. The harshness of the verse, indeed 
the hard quality of the spoken words themselves, came over well; 
altogether it was a spirited rendering. 

The intermediate competition was a lacklustre affair with only two 
entrants. In the opening section, Sark was the better reader if only for 
his sense of timing in W. S. Gilbert's "King Goodheart". For the set- 
piece, Eliot's "Macavity", he came forward again showing commendable 
freshness of interpretation when the audience had already heard it four 
times in the preceding minutes. His reading of Keats' "Ode to Autumn" 
was only just adequate; Barber, on the other hand, was too careless; 
often the sense was lost, words were mispronounced, and the syntax 
is^nored. 



Winners: Senior — Lash 

Intermediate — Sark 



J.S.B. 



'G^^^O 



T H E ASH B U Rl AN 51 

DISTINGUISHED MSITORS 

His Excellency , B. Diiike, Lthiopian Ambassador to Washington — Sep- 
tember 4th. 

W . H. Maii'son, U.K. Ministrv of Education — September 1 7th. During^ 
his Canadian tour Mr. Mawson investigated the problems of educat- 
ing British Service children in this country. 

Robert Thonipsun — Social Credit Leader— October 2nd. 

His Imperial Majesty, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, with members of his 
Cabinet visited his grandson and great grandson on October 9th. 

P. A. Snoir, Chairman of the Public School Bursars' Association of Great 
Britain — August 26th. 

The Rev. Harold M. S. Taylor, former Headmaster of Cheam School, 
England — September 1st. 

Edivard Dixon, Headmaster of Tudor House Preparatory^ School, 
Australia — September 27 th. 



'^^O 



VISITING ORGANIZATIONS 

During the past year the following organizations used the School 
facilities for a variety of functions: 

Canadian Save The Children Fund — Annual Dog Show and Bazaar. 
Touring New Zealand Cricket Team. 
Rockcliffe Park Humane Societv^ Annual Bazaar. 
Royal Commonwealth Society — Evening .Meeting. 
The Youth Commonwealth Questors — Accommodation. 
Mothers' Guild — Clothing Sale and Annual Bazaar. 
Department of External Affairs Wives' Association — Evening Meeting. 
The Royal School Choir of Music from Great Britain — Sixty-two men, 
boys and accompanying staff. 



fg THEASHBURIAN 

LITERARY SECTION 

VIGILANTIA INQUISITIONIUM EX JOYCEO 

Tossing and turning lie still just got to get to sleep try counting 
countinjT what shall I count sheep fences lamp-posts must fix the lamp in 
the dining-room maybe tomorrow oh no not tomorrow tomorrow my 
Rubicon Caesar Brutus \\'hy did Brutus kill Caesar or did Cassius or did 
Cassius Brutus at PhiHppi do some cramming in the morning the morning 
and then the examination Ancient History a pity it didn't stay with 
Ancients wonder what it was like back then under the Pharoahs in 
Athens at Rome w^here they persecuted Christians hide in the tunnels 
under Rome Berlin must be a mess with all those Communists people 
di^rging under the Wall it couldn't be as bad as those newsmen must be 
exags^erating still the Wall's still there a divided city just like a bunch of 
ants can't mix red ants with black ants very long before they start killing 
going to be a massacre tomorrow lucky if I get a pass thank goodness it's 
the last exam before the holidays after it I'll be off lazy lazier laziest it'll 
probably rain 40 days and 40 nights night wish I could get sleep what's 
the use as soon as it'll be time to get up the alarm clock will go off and I'll 
have to dras^ myself tick tock behind me tick tock tick tock seems to be 
sneering hardly able to wait until it can ring it's unholy bell and wake me 
enjoys watching me suffer 

tick tock 
stupid clock 
why doesn't it stop 
tick tock 

forget the clock got to get sleep sleep sleep weep keep reap deep yes yes 
very deep deep sleep peep leap all the way to tomorrow tomorrow 
crocodile with row of shining teeth the examination the history exam the 
supcr-duper brain-rattling world history matriculation examination his- 
tory history and more history Thutmos Alexander Hannibal Saladin 
Herodotus Charlemagne Barbarossa Gains Juluis Caesar the great seizer 
Caesar and Anthony . . . and Cleopatra the Eternal City and the eternal 
triangle good combination history repeats itself true or false Elizabeth 
Taylor's marital lease with Edward Fisher went for a Burton but still this 
horripilating examination tomorrow this inutile egregious nugatory dia- 
bolical malevolent malignant maleficent treacherous relentless barbarous 
detestable abhorrent dolorific obnoxious mortifyinfr vexatious hair- 
withering brain-harrassing heart-corroding palacstric super-abundant 
world history examination but now sleep sleep sleep sleee-e-e-e-e 

Thurston — \^IC 



TH E AS H B U Rl AN $9 

THE OPENING SPEECH 

The Headmaster's spcccli rook place on rhc bright, w arm mornino 
of September sixth. There was an inevitable restlessness among the 
asseml)led students, but that was to be expected, and, after expressing his 
hopes that we had all enjoyed a good vacation and his delight to see us 
again, Mr. Perry welcomed the newcomers to Ashbury and then went 
on to remind each boy of the growing demands of today's universities 
and the efforts required to meet them. He reflected on the academic 
and athletic success of the past year, adding that his hopes now were 
aimed in the same direction, and expressed his belief that every boy he 
addressed was capable of living up to it. He then pointed out the new 
Staff members. When the speech was over, Mr. Perry was given three 
meaningful cheers as he left the stage. And thus began another fruitful 
year at Ashbury College. 

T. R. Flvnn via 



HARD RAIN FALLING 

The sun was shining and the birds were running about. A cloud 
here and there broke the icy blue monotony of the sky. That icy blue. 
Somewhere water was trickling out of an ever-open faucet. There was 
a door creaking on fast-rusting hinges and a car, abandoned and forgotten 
in haste when that hard rain fell. 

MAY 9 

There was a white man that had a black dog on this same street and 
he's dead. In fact they are all dead. Very dead. 

At least I think so. After the rain came all I saw was one man and 
he was mostly rotted away. I guess he was lucky because he didn't die 
right away like mother and father. Maybe he wasn't so lucky — I mean 
to die so slow like that. 

The Russians said it was us who did it first and we said it was the 
Russians who did it first. Anyhow it doesn't matter any more. They 
just don't exist. Personally I think it was the Swiss— they were always 
acting so good and all. They just had to be up to something. 

The sun doesn't go down anymore because there are two of them. 
The second one just came and it won't go away. It's like having two 
big eyes staring at you all the time. I'm pretty sure all the others are 
dead. The birds and all are here but no people — not anywhere. But 
it really isn't lonely and I can sit and read all day because no one can 
stop that now. 



60 r H E ASH B U Rl A N 

MAY 10 

We aren't all dead. I saw another man running down the street. 
When he saw me though he ran away. He thought I was a Communist. 
It's good that there is a lot food around and I can eat what I want. 
I don't even worry about mv skin any more. I just eat what I want. 

MAY 11 

I think this is Sunday. Maybe not. It doesn't seem like Sunday at 
all with no lawn mowers running and all. Maybe I'll start ours. Saw 
that man again he was dead. The smell is pretty bad now because it's 
so hot all the time. I may have to go out of town to get away from it. 
Things are pretty lonely now but I don't think about it much. 

MAY 12 
I'm going to die. The rain got to me finally. I know it now. I 
don't feel any pain but I know I'm going to die. I'm just sorry I have to 
die so soon because it was so quiet and all. I can hardly see the paore and 
I keep wondering if there is a Heaven or Hell but people said I was too 
young to worry about that. It worries me now because it might be 
overcrowded or something and there wouldn't be any room for me. 
This is all I'll write now because I'm tired and I'm going to die so I'll say 

goodbye. 

# # # 

The second sun blinked out and that nameless hard rain be^an to 
fall penetrating everything. It was only making sure. . . . 

David Roxburgh 



ARMISTICE DAY 

Whenever a war has ended, it is customary to set aside a day to 
commemorate the signing of the treaty which ended the hostilities. The 
name of the day persists until the war is erased from the memories of all 
those who should know. November 11, Armistice Day, is such a day. 
It sets aside November eleventh as the day to commemorate the sicrninCT 
of the armistice which ended the hostilities of \\'orld Wat One. The 
Great War, as it was called, has all but faded from the memories of the 
peoples of the world — all except those who fought in it and lost sons and 
husbands by it. 

Now these people are few and far between. Many have died or 
wasted awa\^ Others are decaying in old peoples' homes, isolated from 
the realities of the world. These are the few who can remember and 
have something besides a vague school-taught image of the Great War. 
So many of this generation have no idea of the total destruction and the 
carnage which World War One wreaked upon Europe, indeed the 



TH E AS H B U RI AN 61 

world. This war killed or maimed countless millions of people and 
injured many others, not physically, hut mentally. The effects of 
World War I were far reaching and enduring, for they chang^ed the face 
of Europe. 

Historians tend to put the two great conflicts of this century into a 
concrete group. The Second World War is thought of as a continuation 
of the first great war. Now, a young, forceful generation has arisen 
which seeks to forget war and its effects. 

This generation wants no war and will haye none. It cannot con- 
ceiye of the tremendous passions which gaye rise to these conflicts. 

Perhaps, with maturity, the present generation will see why Armis- 
tice Day is much more than just another holiday. It has, among the 
myriad commemoratiye days and celebrations, more significance than 
any other sanctified day which we might set up. Armistice Day speaks 
out and states a fact— the war is oyer, not just for now but foreyer. 
The world has a reminder which tells all nations neyer again to inyohe 
themselyes in that most terrible of human conflicts — w^ar. 

D.R. 



THE GRAND COUNCIL 

A few years ago I had the priyilege of being allowed to attend an 
Indian Council, and the yiyid picture of this eyent has remained fixed in 
my mind eyer since. 

The night was yery clear but dark due to the presence of only a 
quarter moon. The flickering red-cedar fire in the center of the large 
council rino- illuminated the warriors filing silently into their appointed 
places around the circumference of the enclosure. The sombre shadows 
cast by the trees aboye made eerie outlines on the well trampled earth. 
The continual throbbing of the council drums lent a dreary air to the 
scene. 

After a short while a leather-clothed natiye dashed into the circle 
and immediately the beat of the drums haired. He pronounced the 
arriyal of the great chief and, turning, dashed out again. After a few 
moments the wizened chief entered, followed by a group of chiefs in 
ceremonial garb. The old chief took a position before the company and 
after bidding a welcome, he proceeded to lead the assembled brayes in 
prayers to the four winds, beseeching them to send fayourable \\-eather. 

After this religious ceremony the young braves proceeded to give 
reports of interesting- and often fascinating experiences and discoyeries 
to the learned chief and also to ask questions of his amassed knowledge. 
The ranger reports being terminated, one of the lesser chiefs began to 
accept challenges from the council body in the Indian games which 



62 THEASHBURIAN 

ranged from nature identification contests, wood chopping, and fire 
building event to leg and arm wrestling. 

At a given sign the games were terminated and tlie Chief began to 
narrate a story about Indian lore to the Council which became so en- 
thralled that the great length of time went by unnoticed. As the sky 
began to turn grev in the east, the tribes stood together and in unison 
cried out a prayer to the great spirit, W'akonda, represented by the 
Thunderbird atop the totem pole. Following this the braves made their 
way in silence back to their respective camps, to return later to their own 
hunting grounds. 

Chris Grant 



SEGREGATION 

The man shaded his ev^es, and gazed into the distance. He tried to 
look beyond the sand-covered wasteland that surrounded him, hoping to 
catch a glimpse of a town, or at least a water-hole. All he could see was 
mile after mile of seemingly endless desert, dotted here and there with 
withered cacti and heat-blackened boulders. Disappointed, the man 
sought refuge from the intense heat of the sun beside an out-cropping of 
rock. 

To anyone else, the heat would be unbearable. But the man was a 
nomad, who travelled constantly throughout this arid region, and so he 
had come to accept the presence of heat as an unavoidable drawback. 
His skin, like the rocks of this, his native land, was darkened by the sun, 
and constant exposure had made the outer layer of flesh hke leather. 
Despite the fact that he was accustomed to this climate, beads of sweat 
still rolled from his brow, and his chest heaved convulsively, drawing in 
draughts of stifling warm air. 

The man would have been content to lie in the sparse shade provided 
by the rocks, and be comforted by that clammy sweat. But he knew 
that he must find water, for he could feel the drv^ness slowly creeping 
from his parched throat down towards his belly. After a timeless inter- 
val, he painfully managed to stand erect, and continue his journey. 

But as the day wore on, and the sun reached its zenith, and there was 
no relief in sight, the man knew that the end was approaching. It was 
a feeling he had experienced before, just before he was rescued by an 
isolated water-hole. But this time, there was no water-hole in sight. 

I lis feet became heavy, and difficult to lift. His head throbblcd, his 
vision was blurry, and his tongue hung out of his mouth, pleading for 
M-ater. 

Just when the man was ready to collapse from sheer exhaustion, he 
saw the stranger. The man bHnkcd his swollen cvclids, and looked agjain. 



TH E AS H B U RI AN 63 

The stranger was no more than fifr\' \'ards away. The man began to 
run, or rather stumble, towards his saxiour. But the heat and lack of 
water had greatly weakened the man, and he fell headlong on the burning 
sand. Unable to rise, he lifted his head, and watched the stranger 
approach. 

The stranger, with great gentleness, stooped over the prostrate 
figure and touching him lighth- on the head said, "(.'omc with me, we 
are near the Oasis of Life/' 

G.R.G. 

OTHER PEOPLE'S AMBITIONS FOR ME 

For as long as I can remember, other people have been trying to 
make up my mind as to which profession I should pursue. Each person 
that involves himself with me is convinced that the career he has in mind 
is ideally suited for me, and that in no time I would rise to the top of the 
profession and become a financial success. However, despite their 
sincerity and interest, I have continually refused their advice, for I feel 
that it is really none of their business. I find that this attitude of dis- 
interest will discourage the majority of my would-be benefactors; how- 
ever, a small minority refuse to give up, and continually make a nuisance 
of themselves bv^ deciding my future whenever I am careless enough to 
let myself be seen by them. 

For instance, there is my Uncle Fred. Uncle Fred is perhaps the 
most persistent of all my advisors. Whenever I see him he launches into 
his sales-pitch, describing in glowing terms the advantages of being a 
lawyer. \\'hile in the process of brainwashing me. Uncle Fred builds 
himself up as a sort of minor Perry Mason. I find that this is his greatest 
weakness — his pride — and usually I can switch the conversation around 
to something like "The Crown versus Jasper Quincy", (L'ncle Fred's 
greatest triumph). As Uncle Fred babbles on, basking in glory, I can 
usually slip away unnoticed. 

However, Mr. Laskin, our neighbour, is quite a different matter. 
He specializes in the "soft sell", and so is not easily thrown off course. 
Mr. Laskin is an insurance salesman who can't understand why anybody 
would not want to sell insurance. Although not as persistent as L^ncle 
Fred, he nevertheless makes his presence felt by dropping some sort of 
remark intended to draw my attention to the fact that the insurance 
business is booming. L'sually this remark is directed to someone else, 
but spoken loud enough so that I can hear it. I find that the only way to 
get rid of Mr. Laskin is to turn on the radio so loud that nothing he says 
is heard by anyone else, me in particular. 

Aunt Dorothy, although only an occasional visitor to our home, is 
the most direct in approach. She used to be a nurse, and is firmly con- 
vinced that what our famiU' needs is a o-ood doctor in it. Practically 



64 THEASHBURIAN 

every time that she comes to our house she not only mentions the fact 
but demands to know at least ten good reasons why I should not become 
a doctor. Although I protest that I cannot stand the sight of blood, 
Aunt Dorothy is not one to argue with. There is no way to put Aunt 
Dorothy off the track, short of being rude. 

Despite everybody's advice and hopes for me, they can't make me 
change my mind. I have decided on a career, and intend to stick by my 
decision no matter what others say. I want to be a garbageman. 

G.R.G. 



A REFLECTION ON PHYLLIS McGINLEY 

To most people, the current civil rights struggle taking place in 
society means the Negroes' battle for equality. However, little do they 
realize that women are once again on the march, and are demanding that 
they be recognized as equals by the opposite sex. 

Women are taking advantage of certain rights granted them this 
century, and in effect are attempting to "bite the hand that feeds them". 
They are trying to take over control of the government — the very body 
that granted them the right to vote. At this very moment there are no 
less than four female representatives in Canada's House of Commons. 
Also, a total of two major Canadian cities have women as their mayors. 
Without doubt, the women have banded together and are now laying 
plans for the overthrow of our present stable government. 

If such a plot ever succeeds, it will bring about the ruin of our fair 
Dominion. Indeed, it would probably lead other women in foreign 
countries to attempt similar coups. The result is obvious: a world 
dominated by women, with males being relegated to a position of little or 
no importance. Alore important still, well-run political machines built 
up during the period of the male's supremacy would collapse in a state 
of confusion, only to be replaced by groups of fanatical women. 

One can well imagine what would be accomplished by women 
during tenure in office (supposing that males would eventually recover 
from this blow and seize power once again ) . Canada's Parliament would 
degenerate into an extended coffee-party; the cabinet would be rocked 
by scandal (the Minister of Fashion dyes her hair); the "hot-line" 
between Washington and Moscow would become a gossip line; nothing 
would be decided at disarmament conferences, except that blue shoes do 
not go with a red dress; cosmetic manufacturers would be placed under 
a government trusteeship; and (heaven forbid!) Italian movies would 
be banned througliout the country. 

As one can see, the results would be just short of disastrous. There 
seems to be no way of preventing women from taking over, however. 
Their ranks arc constantly bein^T swelled by recruits M'ho have been 



THE AS H B U RI AN 



65 



thoroue^hlv indoctrinated in methods of terrorism by such groups as 
Girl Guides or Brownies. 

But males should not despair. I have a solution to the entire 
problem which should be satisfactory to every man. Naturally I 
expect the women to raise some sort of protest. After all, slavery has 
been outlawed for the last one hundred years. 

G.R.G. 



'G^^-O 



THE MATHEAIATICS MASTER'S LAMENT 



Oil come all vou fellows 

and listen to me. 

I'll tell you a story 

a story of glee. 

Of a bunch of young fellows 

so strong and so tall 

Whose algebra marks 

are the lowest of all. 

Chorus — 

Lowest of all 
Lowest of all 
Whose algebra marks 
are the lowest of all. 



They leave in the springtime 
Come back in the fall 
And work on equations 
Quadratics and all 
They work in the classrooms 
And out in the hall 
But their algebra marks 
Are the lowest of all. 
Chorus — 

Oh mother dear mother 

Oh what shall I do 

My sorrows are many 

My joys they are few. 

I can't find the square root 

Of X minus two 

I'll pack up my text books 

And come back to you. 

Chorus — 



66 



THE ASH B U RI AN 



Oh Johnny dear Johnny 
Don't take it so sad. 
It's the very same trouble 
Your poor daddv had. 
But many kind masters 
A\'ill answer the calk 
To help out the boys 
who have no marks at all. 
Chorus — 

Now the boys in the Fourth Form 

The big and the small 

Share one thing in common 

They've no brains at all 

They have the best master 

Best master of all 

But their Algebra marks 

Are the lowest of all. 

Chorus — 



The same is true 

Of Six A and B 

They're breaking the hearts of 

The powers that be. 

They're driving the lot of us 

Right up the wall 

For their Algebra Marks are 

the lowest of all. 

Chorus — 

Sing softly, sing softly, 

A requiem mass. 

No one in grade thirteen 

Is likely to pass. 

If all of their masters 

Had knuckles of brass 

Their Algebra marks 

Would improve by Xmas. 

Chorus — 



I'll sing the sad story 
Of five and five A 
And poor Air. Dalton 
His hair's turning grey 
If I had to teach them 
I'd clobber them all 
And gate them on Saturday 
Down in Rhodes Hall 
Chorus — 

Down in Rhodes Hall 
Down in Rhodes Hall 
I'd gate them on Saturday 
Down in Rhodes Hall. 



Some boys they are stupid 
Some boys they are bright 
Some boys have no problems 
With old Hall and Knight. 
They rush to their classrooms 
\\'ith howls of delight 
And their Algebra marks are 
As high as a kite. 
Chorus — 

High as a kite. 

High as a kite, 

Their Algebra marks are 

As high as a kite. 



'G==^0 



THE AS H B U Rl AN 



67 



OLD BOYS^ SECTION 

A) Reunions 
Ottawa 

OLD BOYS' \\'EEKEND XO\\ 9rh and lOrh, 1963 

Once again this \\eekend proved to be a great success. Events 
started at 9:00 a.m. Saturday with an Old Boys' football and soccer 
match against the school. The football game under the able coaching of 
Tinv Hermann, was one of the most exciting games ever seen between 
these t\vo old rivals. The Old Boys on the school one yard line in the 
closing seconds were unable to score and game ended 27-21 in favour 
of the school. The boys were also able to take care of the men in the 
soccer match 3 goals to 1. 

Following the two games a buffet luncheon was held in the school 
gym. .More than one hundred persons were there to aid in the salute to 
Coach Hermann, who retired in "62" after handling the Ashbury 1st 
football team for ten most successful years. 

The 9:00 p.m. formal dance, in the Argyle Building, had a Carribean 
setting this year adding a pleasant atmosphere to a very enjoyable 
evening. Apologies must be made to the very late invitations sent to the 
Ashbury parents, an oversight which will not occur in the future. Sixty- 
six couples were in attendance and it is the hope of the Old Boys' Com- 
mittee that next year's dance will have twice the amount out to enjoy 
this gala evening. 

With the kind invitation of the Headmaster, Mr. Perry, a reception 
Mas held at Ashbury House on Sunday at 12 noon. This was a very 
cordial gathering winding up a highly successful weekend put on by the 
New Ashbury College Old Boys' Association. 

If by chance you were not able to attend this years festivities we 
urge you to make a date for the big "64" Weekend for we can promise 
that you will have a ball. 



THE OLD BOYS' COALMHTEE 




R. E. L. Gill. J. R. Wcdd, John Fraser. B. K. Hillary. Blair Gilmour. 



6f 



THE ASHBURIAN 



Among those who signed 


the Register were: 


J. Bethune 


G. P. Jackson 


J. Boone 


R. Kemp 


]. Booth 


J. Kerriiish 


"C. F. Bray 


R. Lackey 


J. Chaniard 


N. Lynn 


P. Cotton 


D. MacDonald 


C. R. Davidson 


R. Mundv 


I. Ewing 


E. V. B.' Pilgrim 


H. Flam 


J. C. Rogan 


J. Fraser 


P. Row^an-Legg 


D. Gamble 


R. \y. Southam 


E. L. Gill 


M. Sutherland 


F. T. Gill 


C. Tucker 


P. Gillean 


L. Ward 


B. Gilmour 


J. B. Wedd 


R. Goodis 


G. Whitcher 


G. Haslam 


\\. Widdrington 


B. Hinev 


\\; A\'ilson 


R. Howith 


K. A\^oolley 



ASHBURY RECEPTIONS 

During the past School Year x\shbury has held a number of recep- 
tions for its Old Boys, Parents and Friends. Below is a summary of 
each of these events: 

.l/O.VTT^E.^L - December 6th. 1963 -Instead of holding the usual 
Noon buffet luncheon in Montreal, Old Boys, Parents and Friends were 
invited to a Reception at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Commodore and 
A4rs. Ross, the Headmaster and .Mrs. Perry and Mr. Evan Gill received. 
Although more turned out than to previous reunions, the numbers 
were disappointing-. 

rO/'^ONV^O — January 31st, 1964 — The response to the Toronto 
gathering, which was held at the Park Plaza, was approximately double 



THE LONDON RECEPTION— Photograph Page (^9—ReiidhT: tnii to bottom starting 
with left hand colwwv. Old Boys and Parcnrs-r Richord Fidlcr, Peter Crump. Rodney 
Moore, Robert Kerr; A. Earrugia, Miss Jean Lcwington, Mrs. Earrugia; E. C. N. 
Edwards and Richard Sykes; Mrs. Svkes, Mrs. \\ A. L'nstrum, Ne'^ale Edwards; 
Mr. Stan Eidler, Mrs. Donald Kerr, Mrs. Eidler, Mrs. A. Bercnds; Lr. Col. and Mrs. 
S. E. Aloorc, Mrs. K. G. Thorne; The Earl and Countess Alexander and the 
Headmaster; Nicholas de Winton, Mrs. Edwards. 



70 T HE ASHBU Rl AN 

the turnout at previous receptions. It was quite obvious that all who 
attended, enjoyed this outing. On the receiving end — the Headmaster 
and Mrs. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. Frank D. Bliss and Mr. E. N. Rhodes, Jr. 

LONDON — March 23rd, 1964 — For the second year, a Reception was 
held in London for Ashbury Old Boys, Parents and Friends, with the 
Headmaster welcoming the guests. Thanks to the generosity of the 
High Commissioner for Canada and to the assistance of J. S. P. Arm- 
strong^, an Ashbury Old Boy, and at present. Agent General for Ontario 
in London, the Reception was held in one of the Canadian Government 
rooms at 1 Grosvenor Square. 

The most interesting feature of the London gathering was the 
number of different school groups who attended. In addition to many 
recent Old Boys, there were former staff, Old Boys from Abinger Hill 
and present parents. Among the distinguished guests were the Earl and 
Countess Alexander of Tunis, and their son Brian, J. S. P. Armstrong, 
Air Commodore and Mrs. C. W. Busk, Dr. G, D. W. Cameron, Air 
Commodore and Mrs. B. J. R. Roberts, Mr. Kenneth AVeston. 

OTTAWA — M^y 5th, 1964 — What was originally intended to be a 
relatively small Reception at the Rideau Club for approximately 100 
persons, turned out to be a "sell-out", with over 250 attending. As the 
Club was not prepared for such a large number, quarters were somewhat 
cramped but in spite of this everyone seemed to think it was an excellent 
affair. To greet the guests were the Chairman, Commodore Ross 
and Mrs. Ross, the Headmaster and Mrs. Perry and Mr. and Mrs. Blair 
Gilmour. 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE CORPORATION 

On June 18th, the Annual Aieeting of the Corporation was held, 
and this was followed by a Dinner which was addressed by A. B. R. 
Lawrence, Q.C., A4.P.P. He spoke of the proposed expansion plans 
and also, very amusingly, reminisced about his experiences as a member 
of Parliament in Toronto. 

Among those who attended were: 

H. Brouse M. Grant 

M. Copcland R. Hyndman 

G. Currie A. Mordy 

C. R. Davidson R. iMundy 

P. R. Davidson A. Perley-Robertson 

S. C. Evans (Dr.) Commodore W. G. Ross 

J. Eraser P. B. Smellie 

C. L. Gill D. Carcrill Southam 

E. L. Gill J. Tyle^r 

F.Gill J. B.'Wedd 

B. Ciilmour G. A\\)ollc()mbe 



THE ASH B LRl A N 11 

AIARRIAGLLS 

Co iTON— Dickson. Jennifer, Leslie Dickson to Peter Ross Cotton, 
( 1956-59), son of Lt. Col. and Mrs. I I. F. (Cotton, Ottawa. Aug-ust 
24th 1963 in Ottawa. 

Ir\ IX— Caxtley. Susan Mc.Murran Cantlev to Joseph Sedlev Trvin, 
(1951-56), son of iMr. Joseph S. Irvin, (1918-28), and Mrs. Irvin, 
Rockcliffe Park. March 7th 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Maclaren— AIoNGER. Ann Monger to George Roy Maclaren, (1951- 
57), son of A'Ir. A. R. Maclaren, (1909-15), and Mrs. Maclaren of 
Buckingham, P.Q. June 27th 1964. 

Spencer— Sagawa. Margaret Yukiko Sagawa to Michael Charles Spen- 
cer, (1958-61), son of iMrs. Catherine Spencer, (staff 1958-61), July 
11th 1964, in Tokyo. 

Carver— WooLGAR. Penny Matua Woolgar to Peter Ciordon King 
Carver, (1948-53), son of Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey Carver of 
Ottawa. August 1st 1964, in Montreal. 

LeBoutillier— Fell. Elizabeth Sherrill Fell to Charles Pierre Reynolds 
LeBoutillier, (1948-53) son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles LeBoutillier of 
Wayne, Pa., August 22nd 1964, in Brockville. 

Hamilton— Senter. Donna Lee Senter to Lm Stewart Hamilton at 
Christ Church, Aylmer East. September 26th, 1964. 



'e^O 



12 



THE ASHB URIAN 



B) TJ?ose Attejiding University 

Bishop's University: 
T. N. Coristine 
E. Detchon 
J. D, Gillespie 

University of Toronto: 
I. M. Ewing 
A. F. Gill 
P. Noel-Bentley 

McGiLL University: 
R. J. x\ddleman 
D. Brodhead 
T. Brodhead 
P. G. Ekes 
M. Farrugia 

C. Flam 

D. Flam 
P. Geggie 

G. Greenstone 

Carleton University: 
J. /Vnsley 
J. I. Bethune 
J. Birkett 
M. Bishop 
D. A. R. Browning 
D. ChapHn 
C. Davidson 
R. Dickson 

Acadia University: 
C. Bodger 
S. Gamble 

A4ount Allison University: 
J. R. Booth 
K. Cook 
iM. J. Copeland 

University of Manitoba: 
C. Cantlie 

Dalhousie University: 
J. Brown 
|. Fisher 
C. A. Flood 



B. J. Merrett 

S. G. R. Pottinger 



S. M. O. Parker 
P. T. Rowe 



G. P. G. Haslam 
N. M. Lynn 
D. Ross 
H. Short 
P. C Stein 

D. A. Steven 

E. H. Stewart 
J. G. A. Tyler 
Al. E. Whipps 

P. Marland 
R. Monks 
R. Mundy 
C J. O'Brien 
P. Rowan-Legg 
J. Tucker 
D. A. W^ood 
K. G. Woolley 

J. Gamble 
C Moffatt 



R. W. Duncan 

J. J. Letch 

J. R. Smethurst 

R, Dickson 



j. S. Levitz 
R. R. Mclnnes 



THE ASHBURIAN 
UxivF.Rsn Y OF Bruish Columbia: 

Har\ Aui) University: 
B. Alexandor 

D. Gnihani 

QUEKX'S UmMRSII Y: 

P. Al. Bow 
R. Lackcv 

UnIVERSH Y OF () I lAWA: 

E. D. Armour 
M. Kirby 

Laval UxiVERsrrY: 
Cornell Universiiy: 
Colgate University: 
Washington and Lee University 
Keble College, Oxford: 
Cambridge University: 



73 



iM. Butcher 
M. Rasminsky 

K. S. Mcnzies 
T. Merrett 

L. W'hitniarsh 

G. R. .MacLaren 
J. S. LindeU 
B, A. Zaporski 
J. D. MacLanrin 
R. .Moore 



R. Fidler 
Rev. T. Finlav 



University of California at Berkley: 

V. Fascio 



Ottawa Teachers' College: 
St. Francis Xavier University: 
St. Mary's University: 
College Royale Militaire: 
Oakland University, Michigan: 



P. M Gillean 
P. G. F. McCain 
AL A. Alurray 
T. A. H. Sparling 
A. D. Ivev 



■J4 TH E ASH BURI AN 

So?ne Occupations and Activities of Old Boys of interest: 
Peter C Berry— Commander H.M.C.S. Algonquin. 

Peter G. K. Carver— Married Penny Woolgar in Montreal on August 

1st. 
Lt.-Col. J. D. Conyers— President of Sreynoe Investment Company in 

Hamilton Bermuda. 

Richard Elmer— Sales Engineer for Taylor Instrument Co., Toronto. 

Victor Fascio— Now has his M.A. from University of California and is 
working for his Ph.D. 

A. M. Irvine— Research Administrative Officer at Dominion Tar and 
Chemical Company. 

D. Ross Kerr— Production Engineer with the Hudson Bay Oil and Gas 

Co. Ltd. 

Allen Letch— Department Section Head of T. Eaton Co. Ltd., in 
London, Ontario. 

H. W. Price— Now Vice-President of Toilet Laundries Limited. 

V. B. Rivers— Aeronautical Engineer at Yuma, Arizona. 

G. Bruce Ross— C. A. Student working with Price, Waterhouse & Co., 
Toronto. 

S/L. W. R. Scott— Still in the R.C.A.F. at Gimli, Manitoba. 

M. C. Spencer— Now a B.A. from Sophia University, Tokyo and was 
married this July. 

E. H. Van Der Kaay— Is a development Engineer with Sylvania Elec- 

tric Co., Williamsport, Pa., and studying for his M.Sc. on Physics at 
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. 

G. R. Wilson— Is an Accounting Supervisor with the Bank of Bermuda. 

Ashbury is well represented in the House of Commons by D. S. 
MacDonald, A. Brewin and J. Turner. 

Rodney Moore has just graduated from the Honour School of 
Jurisprudence at Keble College — Oxford University. 

On the staff of the Faculty of Law at Ottawa University are — 
John L. Nesbitt, B.A., Lecturer in Civil Procedure and E. Peter New- 
combe, Q.C., B.A., Lecturer in Practice. 

John Melvin Wallis was awarded an Athlone Fellowship for post 
graduate study in the United Kins^dom. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



IS 



Sgt.-iMajor Fred W. Stone 

Died December 8th 1963, as the aftermath of an accident which 
occurred when he was struck by a car while riding his bicycle. Sergeant- 
Major Stone joined the Ashbury Staff in 1924 as Physical Instructor, 
after a long and colourful army career which began in 1902 with his 
enlistment in the Hampshire Regiment. He served in Malta, Bermuda, 
iMauritius, and India prior to the First World War. Subsequently he 

went to Gallipoli where he was 
wounded. He then instructed in small 
arms and gymnastics until his discharge 
in 1923. 

His duties at Ashburv included gym- 
nastics and Cadet training which he 
finally relinquished in 1938. 

Sergeant-Major Stone maintained a 
lively interest in the affairs of Ashbury 
and made his last appearance at the 
vSchool during the B.C.S. football game 
on November 2nd. 




'G^^ID 



THE ASH B URIAN 



PREFECTS 




A. W. Anderson 




W. J. Booth 

(Capt. of Day 

Bovs) 




G. R. Garten 






P. C. Hunt 



G. B. Keffcr 




R. Al. Sniallian 



7' H E A S H H U Rl AN 77 

ASHBURY DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN 

It is probably not news that Ashbury is planning to make additions 
to its building which will add much needed facilities to the school, and 
increase its boarding potential. 

The Campaign, initiated by the present Board of Governors, has 
appointed D. Cargill Soutliam as its Chairman and already much progress 
has been made to build up the necessary organization. 

The proposed new buildings include a complete Junior School, 
with accommodation for 40 boarders and 50 to 60 day boys. It will 
contain dormitories, classrooms and all other necessary facilities. Also 
to be constructed as soon as possible is a new gymnasium. The existing 
gymnasium, which is now much too small for basketball and other indoor 
activities, will be converted into a panelled library, complete with study 
rooms, an audio-visual room and a Committee Room. The new Unit 
will include a bright new entrance to the School, with offices and a 
reception room. 

Needless to say, the prospect of having more rooms for various 
activities is a pleasant one. The plans for the basement of the gymnasium 
call for Games Rooms, Cadet Rooms, Band Rooms, Ski Rooms and a new 
Locker Room for students and visitors. 

Although a good start has already been made, it is expected that the 
official opening of the Campaign to raise funds for the development will 
commence sometime in the Autumn of 1964. 



THE MOTHERS' GUILD 

The Ashbury .Mothers' Guild had another busy year with regular 
monthly meetings and two interesting sales— The Autumn Outgrown 
Clothing and Sports Equipment Sale and Spring Tea and Bake Sale. 

As a result of the hard work and interest of this group sufficient 
money has been raised to purchase drapes for the junior School dormi- 
tories, 2 fine silver services, 2 tablecloths and 100 silver spoons. In 
addition, the Guild has added ?^200.00 to its Investment Fund and pro- 
vided a $250.00 Bursary. 

The school is grateful for the continued interest of this group led by 
a Committee consisting of: 

Mrs. J. E. Copeland, President; Airs. J. B. Ewing, \^ice-President; Mrs. 
F. R. Thurston, Secretary; Mrs. A. L. Thurlow, Treasurer; Mrs. G. D. 
Turner, .Membership; Mrs. H. M. Weld, Telephone Convener; Mrs. E. L. 
Deacon, Tea Convener; Mrs. R. H. Perry, I lonorary President. 



J^utographs 



JUNIOR 
ASHBURIAN 




ASHBTJRY COLLEGE 

OTTAWA 



JUNIOR VOLUME IX 



1964 



80 



THE ASH B U RI AN 



JUNIOR ASHBURIAN STAFF 

Editor — G. I. Brodie-Brockwell 

Sports Editor — Tony Farrugia 

Photographs — Michael Howes 

Staff Advisor — L. I. H, Spencer, Esq. 



For7/i Notes 



Trans A 
Trans B ■ 



B. Fires ione 

P. AllCHELSON 



IIIA 
IIIB 
IIIC 

Junior School Officers 



— S. CoPELAxND 

— D. Turner 

— K. Merkley 



Day Boy Monitors 

Duncan Gow 

Bill Harsh 

John Nelms 

Christopher Sharp 

James Tyas 



Boarder Wijig Monitors 

Don Moulds— AVing Commander 

Russell Armitage 

Rod Ennis-Smith 

Tony Farrugia 

P. Alichelson 

Lee Nielsen 



Transitus A 

A. Farrugia 

B. Firestone 



Librarian — G. I, Brodie-Brockwell 
P. LoFTus, Assistant 

Chapel Monitor — James Tyas 

For7n Monitors 
Transitus B III A 

R. Ennis-Smith A. Deutsch 
L. Nielsen D. DoHin 



lllC 

W. Ducharme 

D. Vennor-Morris 



Soccer 

D. Moulds 

A. Farrugia (Under 13) 

G.Blvth (Under 11) 



// 
G. Flayley 
W. Hatch 

Games Captains 



llIB 

A. Blaumann 

A. Rincon 

I 



G. Baxter 
B. Begamudre 



Hockey 

D. Moulds 

A, Farrugia (Under 13) 



Cricket 

A. Farrugia 

D. Moulds, Vice-Captain 



THE ASH BU RI AN 81 



FOREWORD 

\^olume IX, niv ninth, and last. Junior Ashburian! In spite of all 
the rumors to the contrary, this is niv^ last magazine, and now that I have 
started to write this, I have become extremely nostalgic. Usually about 
this time of the year I am an impossible person, worrying about this 
important job, as well as the examination results, and whether this or that 
boy will arrive safely in some far corner of the world. Yes, I shall miss 
it all. When you work w^ith boys closely, as one must do to produce a 
reasonable addition to our "Senior" Ashburian, you get to know them 
well, and discover characteristics that have been dormant in the class- 
room, or on the playing field. A couple of the more discerning past 
editors have told me things about myself that I had either forgotten or 
pushed into the background! 

This final year has been interesting, with Beebie as the Editor. For 
those who bother to read this Foreword, there will be no need for me to 
elaborate further. I would like to mention, however, the wonderful 
support given our Editor by his parents. Dr. and .Mrs. Brodie-Brockwell 
made a special journey from Montreal to take Beebie and me out to dinner 
so that we could discuss the implications of the job of Editor, and any 
other matters connected with the publication of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 

This year the Junior Ashburian goes into its ninth year. 

I am afraid there is not much in the way of a literary section because 
we started a little late in the year. I would like to thank .Mr. Polk, .Mr. 
Spencer, my assistants, and the boys themselves for their fine help to get 
this show on the road. 

In other respects the magazine should be up to the fine standards that 
former editions of the Junior Ashburian have raised it to. I certainly 
hope that I have not let us down. 

My thanks to the Junior School. 



S2 THEASHBURIAN 



VALETE 

Ten years multiplied by two become twenty years. Between them 
Mrs. Dalton and Mr. Spencer have given twenty years to the Junior 
School. Their contribution is the greater when we remember that the 
Junior School has been an entity for only these past ten years. 

My notes in the 1963 Ashburian paid tribute to Mr. Spencer; to his 
value as a "character"; to his abihties in the classroom and on the playing 
field. There is little need to repeat. Those who know him, and all 
junior school parents do, will understand how much he will be missed. 
He is leaving to take over the junior department of the Halifax Grammar 
School. iMay his problems be few and his bridge partners astute. 

Mrs. Dalton is the type of teacher which every Junior School should 
have. Boys going to school for the first time are a little frightened, but 
very excited. To them it is a new and almost grown-up world that they 
are entering. The experience is usually the most momentous one in their 
young lives. This is why the first teacher a boy has is so very important. 
It was here that Mrs. Dalton made her great contribution. In her little 
world, separated from the rest of us, school days were happy days for 
her boys. She gently eased them into the restricting routine of school 
life and made learning a pleasure. Our best wishes go with her as she 
enters the business world. 



'G^iO 



THE ASHB U RI AN 



8S 




L. I. H. Spencer 



A PERSONALITY 

The dictionary tells us that a personality is the identity, character 
and personal traits of an individual person. The person whom I am 
going to tell of, it not someone easily forgotten, but always remembered. 

When I met him for the first time, it was my first day at Ashbury and 
I was alone and very timid. He soon had me feeling at my ease and 
talking freely about anything and everything. I never forgot that first 
day and in the years since, my admiration and respect for him has only 
grown. 

I am not the only one who feels this way, for every student who has 
ever gone to Ashbury and known him, either as master, friend or ac- 
quaintance, will always remember him. His robust build, his witt)^ 
humour, and his jovial personality, could, each in themselves, never be 
forgotten. 

The eames of soccer and cricket took on a new lio^ht with him as 
coach. At a game, one might hear a haught)'' cry of encouragement from 
our one-man Australian cheering section to spur us on to new and greater 
feats. 

In the classroom his way was no less dynamic. He always had the 
right answer and would always defend his views to the last. Many a 



84 THEASHBURIAN 

riotous time was spent in fast argument with the wizard himself, only in 
the end for the student to be forced to yield, defeated. 

Of his many abilities I think his greatest is his fantastic way of 
teaching. He could make a rather dull Shakespearean work come alive 
in his spirited, accented, orations. Work became a thing of the past; he 
turned History into an exciting tale of adventure, conquest, and explora- 
tion; English Literature, English Grammar, and Geography all took on 
a new fascination. 

As editor of the Junior School Ashburian, head of the Debating 
Teams, and head of the Public Speaking Teams, his great abilities for 
organization and management shone through. He encouraged many 
students in writing and other such endeavours always bringing new 
honours to Ashbury. 

"Seven-no-trump!" became a common cry as he quickly made his 
way from game to game, until he ultimately became bridge champion of 
Ottawa. It was also due to his organization that the game of bridge was 
introduced into the school. Last year the tale was the same as he and 
his partner proved victorious in the bridge tournament. 

Now he is leaving Ashbury, and moving on. Ashbury is losing a true 
friend, and all who have known him will miss him, but let us hope that he 
is as true as his boomerang and that iMr. Spencer will return. 

B. L. Deacon 



'G^i.O 



GOOD BYE TO A NICE FRIEND 

iMrs. Dalton is leaving Ashbury this year, after teaching Form I for 
ten years. We are sad that she is leaving the school, and if she should 
ever go back to teaching, we hope that she will have a vcrv nice time. 
Even though she is not going to teach, we still wish her a happy time. 

Geoffrey Baxter, 
Monitor, Form I 



THE ASH B U Rl A S s5 

THE YEAR 

The school day is full; however we find time for various activities 
beyond the routine of classroom and games fields. Some of these are 
listed as a pleasant reminder for the boys, and to give parents a fuller 
picture of our life. 

CULTURE. This rather pompously named Monday half hour 
provides quite a varied program. The initial period is always taken by 
Air. Polk and explains the School Prayer, Hymn, the graces said at meals; 
gives a brief history of the School and its house system. 

Last year several periods were devoted to slides. These took us far 
afield. Mr. Attwell brought a friend whose pictures were of the Boy 
Scout Jamboree in Greece. Air. Mncent showed us scenes of his earlier 
teacliing da^s in East Africa. Air. Alorgan provided interesting slides 
of Sable Island, and, closer to home, Air. Perry showed us the movie 
record of recent Ashburv" years. 

For those musicalU' inclined, we heard the RCAF band with its fine 
vocalists (the entire school had this treat); one of Aliss W'oodburn's 
pupils gave an exciting piano recital, and Air. Hewitt gave us two after- 
noons in the Chapel where he explained and played the organ. 

One of the most interesting of the Culture periods was provided by 
Air. Pemberton, head of the History Department here, who crave an 
account of the hour by hour events leading up to the death of Lincoln. 

We had talks on the Stock Alarket, on Shakespeare's Engrland, on 
Education in the North — this was a talk given by Air. C. Baker of the 
Deparmient of External Affairs, Education Division, a valuable half hour; 
and on asbestos mining. Our Culture periods cover a wide rans^e of 
interests! 

MISS WOODBURN\S PARTY. On Sunday September 22, the 
entire \\ ing was taken to Aliss \\ oodburn's house for good food and a 
good time. Air. Sinclair, Aliss Black, Air. Alorgan and Air. Hols provided 
transportation. 

HAILE SELASSIES VISIT \v:is one of the highlights of the year 
and Alakonnen must have felt particularly proud of his grandfather 
when he awarded the School a half-holiday. This half-holiday became 
for us a crames afternoon: 

1. Our Under 1 2 soccer team played against Sedbergh and won 3-0. 

2. \\'hile this match was being played, a Track Alcet was held 
for all boys 10 years and under. 



S6 THE ASHBU Rl AN 

3. This was followed by a soccer match for the under lO's. 

4. Next came a House soccer match — Alexander (2) vs Con- 
naught (0). 

Finally Mr. Anderson and Mr. Hillary took a group of boys to see 
a fine display of gymnastics by a touring Danish team. 

ACADEMIC STIMULATION. The Sensational Seven Club (the 
top seven boys in each Form) and the Top Banana Club (those gaining a 
percentage of 80% or better) were maintained this year. Members of 
the Top Banana Club at various times were Bissonnet, Davis, Farrugia, 
Firestone, Macfarlane (who once gained the superlative average of 90%), 
Aiichelson and Vennor-Morris. 

An innovation was the awarding of House points for academic 
achievement. A boy who gained a First Class average in terminal 
examinations was given two points for his House, a Second Class average 
brought one point. These points were counted for the Wilson Shield 
which is awarded annually to the School House, Alexander. Connaught, 
or Woollcombe, gaining the highest number of points. Until this year 
these points had been given solely on athletic abilities. 

The day free from school for the Form making the highest increase 
in marks between Christmas and Easter was won by Transitus A. An 
account of this day appears elsewhere. 

THE FOOTBALL DINNER. Moulds, Cann IV and Farrugia 
represented the Junior School at this event November 22. 

ACROSS THE TOP OF THE WORLD. On December 4 Phillip 
Allen was brought to the School for a 1 \ hour program on the Northland. 
He showed slides, described his experiences within the Arctic Circle, 
and answered many questions. 

JOTTINGS. 35 Juniors scored points for their houses in the 
annual cross country runs. This is about 33?^ of the Junior School and 
must be close to a record. 

Mr. Gillean started a shooting club and every Junior boarder had 
his turn in the rifle range. 

The Best Room Award went to Room 4 — Comett, Room Captain. 
His room mates were Cann IV, Knox and McGuff. 



THE ASH B U Rl AN ^ 

MEMORIAL WING NOTES 

Once again the number of junior boarders forced us to establish 
an "Island in the Big House". This is a large room in the senior school 
taken over by juniors. They follow our normal routine from rising to 
bed time, and indeed many feel flattered to think thcv are over with the 
giants of the upper school. However it is much more suitable to have 
all juniors under one roof, and next year will bring this about. 

The year has been a good one with only the normal, expected, 
amount of boyish mischief to deal with. How dull life would be if 
every boy did what he was told and never got into trouble! "Dealing" 
with the occasional trouble and also maintaining the happy atmosphere 
was my right hand (and arm and leg, indeed bod\^ and spirit) man, 
-Mr. Gillean. Although all of us took our days for evening duty, Mr. 
Gillean was a permanent force in the A\'ing. His evening milk and 
cooky sessions vith the Monitors will give these bovs pleasant, lasting 
memories, and the session is a privilege which the younger ones look 
forward to when they rise to the exalted status of Monitor. Older boys 
know they could go to Mr. Gillean with their problems, and he held 
many a long, calming session. 

Mrs. Boyce has been equally important to the smooth operation of 
our Memorial ^^'ing. Laundry and dry cleaning has to be supervised; 
little boys have to be bathed; buttons and name tapes have to be sewed 
on and scratches bandaged. But mainly httle bovs need a touch of 
mothering to counteract the mascuHne atmosphere of a boys school. 
Mrs. Boyce's room, at the other end of the hall from Mr. Gillean's, was 
the evening centre for the younger ones and occasional parties, aided by 
the television set, brought cheer to many a small boy's heart. 

JUNIOR SCHOOL CHAPEL 

At 8:40 every morning the Juniors line up on the stairs of Aroryle 
and then file over to the Chapel. Here we have a short service as a start 
for the day. The Junior Monitors read the Lesson — a very valuable 
ex-perience for them. Our Chaplain, Mr. Attwell gives us a short inter- 
pretation of the Lesson; we sing a hymn and say prayers. As a result of 
this simple Service, I feel we are better able to start the academic day at 
9:00 o'clock. 

This year members of the staff" took turns reading the Lessons each 
Wednesday. On Fridays the Senior Chaplain, Rev. K. B. Monks, takes 
the Service and we practice the hymns which are to be sung the follow- 
ing Sunday. 

The usual Confirmation classes were held during the year under the 
guidance of Mr. Attwell, and on April 30th the Lord Bishop of Ottawa 



gg TH E ASH BU RI AN 

confirmed these Juniors: Terrance Cochrane, Stuart Dean, Andrew 
Gow, Phihp Loftus and John Nelms. 

Our Choir was once again under the direction of .Mr. Godfrey 
Hewitt, organist and choir master at Christ Church Cathedral. His 
assistant was Mrs. Dalton who played at our daily services and also on 
Sundays, 

The Chapel Monitor was James Tyas, and Choir Monitor, Philip 
Loftus. 



THE JUNIOR LIBRARY 

The Library, while an improvement over past years, is still too 
small. Boys can browse through the shelves, but there is no space to 
sit and read. The situation will be remedied in our new Junior School 
building which has a large room set aside for the purpose. 

However, boys will read if they are encouraged, and this year more 
boys read more books than ever before in our ten year history. One 
reason for the increased use of the Library was surely the large number 
of colourful jacketed books which were bought with the generous contri- 
butions of Airs. iMichelson. The money has made possible the purchase 
of well over one hundred books. 

A4rs. Burritt is thanked, too, for her presentation of boys annuals; 
these are very popular with all ages. 

Forms I and II have libraries in their classrooms, and the Form I 
library was almost doubled in size by the thoughtful gift of Mrs. 
Venables. 



R.CA.F. BAND CONCERT 

The entire School crowded into the Argyle x\ssembly Hall on 
November the 18th to listen to an instrumental and vocal concert put on 
by the R.CA.F. Band. It was a most enjoyable event. 



THEASHBURIAN 89 



Meeting of the Preparatory School Committee 
of the Canadian Headmasters^ Association 



Held Saturday, April 18, 1964 at Upper Canada College under the 
Chairmanship of Alan Stephen. 

This was a valuable and worthwhile meeting attended by represen- 
tatives from no less than twenty independent schools. 

The first exchange of ideas was informal on Friday evening at a 
Dinner held at the University Club of Toronto. 

The Saturday morning session was given over to a talk by Dr. 
R. B. W. Jackson, Director of Educational Research of the Ontario 
College of Education. This was a somewhat frightening appraisal of 
the increasing dominance in our lives of the machine. His address was 
so highly regarded that a request was made for copies to be sent for 
distribution to Headmasters and Chairmen of Boards of the schools 
attending the Meeting. 

Following the pattern set in past years, the afternoon session was 
given over to a discussion of topics which had been submitted by mem- 
ber schools. 

Such matters as the changes in the Alaths curriculum, academic 
requirements for School teams, oral vs. formal French, cuisenaire arith- 
metic, Formal spelling were discussed. 

For the cuisenaire method, valuable only through Grades 3 or 4, it 
is apparently necessary to have specially trained teachers. 

DLP 



^G^.13 



90 



THE ASHBURIAN 



ART 

Due to the transfer of Mr. S. Daratha to France on exchange teach- 
ing, the Junior School art classes were taken over by Major H. J. Woods. 

Classes were formed in three groups, Transitus A and B, III A and B, 
and II IC, with each group having a double period each week. 

Sketch books and pencils were purchased, and all classes began 
sketching very early in the school year from various models. 

Naturally the early efforts were not outstanding, as not too many 
boys were able to get enthusiastic about serious sketching, but a distinct 
improvement was evident as the Christmas holidays approached, and a 
project for each boy to produce a personal Christmas card for his family 
brought some very good results. 

After the holidays it was suggested by Aliss Woodburn that perhaps 
music and art instruction could be combined to illustrate the lives and 
works of the composers Beethoven and Haydn. 

This was done with the boys supplying their own materials and 
having a free rein in presentation and lay-out. The results here were 
very encouraging and the display showing much originality was put on 
view at the Parents Reception in the spring. 

Of the 65 junior boys in the art classes about 15% show signs of 
latent talent in this work, and it is hoped that they will continue to study 
and practice in what can be a very rewarding hobby. 

Some of the difficulties to be met and overcome in this work are 
(a) classes are a bit too large for good instruction and personal super- 
vision, (b) small school desks are not suitable for sketching (trestle 
tables with the boys standing would be better) and (c) storage facilities 
for all art supplies are needed. 

Trips by classes to the National Gallery would be of immense help 
in the teaching of art appreciation, but it is not clear how this could be 
fitted into an already full school schedule. 

On the whole it has been a pleasant and rewarding year, and I am 
satisfied the boys have gained some knowledge of art appreciation. 

H.J.^^^ 




THEASHBURIAN pi 

MUSIC CLASSES IN THE JUNIOR SCHOOL 

This year in our music classes at Ashbury the ORFF system of 
teaching was introduced in the early grades. We are proud to be among 
the first schools in Ottawa to use this ingenious method which gives the 
student an opportunity to experience music with his whole being by 
singing, pla\ing the lovely sounding ORFF instruments speaking and 
moving in rhythm. In time the children begin to create rhythm and 
melodies of their o\\'n without the tedious study of notation. 

The older boys were introduced to the fundamentals by means of 
recorders and folk songs. In coordination with the art classes some 
outstanding projects were done on the times and music of Beethoven and 
Mozart. It has been an interesting and successful year. 

The music prizes were presented at the closing ceremonies to those 
listed in "The Ashburian". 

Irene A\ oodburx AA'right 

JUNIOR PUBLIC SPEAKING 

For his well prepared speech on "The Conservation of Canadian 
Wild Life", Tony Farrugia was awarded the prize for the best pubhc 
speaker in the Junior School. In spite of his inclusion of forests under 
the title "Wild Life", his intimate manner of speaking was so impressive 
that one almost forgot that forests were not wild life at all! 



JUNIOR SCHOOL POETRY READING COMPETITION 

Before the whole of the Junior School assembled in Argvle, six 
finalists competed for the C. G. Drayton Prizes. 

In the senior section the three candidates first read a prepared poem, 
G. K. Chesterton's "The Donkey". NeiA^es played a big part in the 
breathless nature of the recitations and frequently words and phrases 
were obscured. Brodie-Brockwell alone showed any understanding 
of the poem and evoked some feeling in the last stanza. Then the can- 
didates were presented with W. B, Yeats' "The Fiddler of Doonev" for 
an unprepared test. This poem was naturally less successfully rendered. 

The Junior Section had prepared A. E. W^etherald's "The Plow- 
man". Here the reading was of a good standard. The three candidates 
were also asked to read "The Fiddler of Dooney". Here lifeless and 
hesitant readings discredited MacDonald and Morris, while Osmond's 
appropriately cheerful rendering with all the \\'ords easily audible made 
him a clear winner. 

Prizes to I. G. C. Brodie-Brockwell and P. W. H. Osmond were 
announced later. The assembly concluded with a fcM- remarks on the 
performances from Mr. Batts, the Senior School's English master. 



92 



THE ASHBURIAN 



UNDER 14 SOCCER 

Don iMoulds, the Captain of the Under 14 Soccer Team, lead his 
team to victory at Sedbergh on September 25 th. The Sedbergh bov^s 
were not able to get their usual practice games, and were defeated 4-0. 
However, for the return game at Ashbury — one of the most exciting 
Junior games in my ten years at Ashbury — Sedbergh boys were able to 
score a goal at the end of the game, to defeat .Mould's excellent team 1-0. 
The fine spirit of sportsmanship displayed at the game, and afterwards 
during the discussion over milk and cookies, was an example for the 
Captain's successor to remember. As every boy on both teams played 
so well, there is no member of either side who can be singled out for 
mention. 

Ian Spexcer— Coach 







UNDER 14 SOCCER TEAM 



1965-1964 



Back Row. L. I. H. Spencer, Esq., G. Hayley, P. G. Loftus, .M. .Makonnen, R. W. Harsh, 

J. M. Cornett, R. H. Armitage, M. J. Palmer. 
Front Row. P. Michelson, A. D. Gow, D. R. Moulds, Capt., A. Farrugia, \'ice-Capt., 

A. P. Deutsch, S. C. Dean. 
hi Front: T. A. H. Cann. 



THE ASH B U Rl AN 



93 



UNDER 13 SOCCER 

It was a disappointed team which lost to Selwyn House on Septem- 
ber 30th. W'c had anticipated a victory for we appeared to be stronger 
than ever, but our optimism was unjustified. 1 lowever, the trip back 
from Montreal was a different story for the team had managed to defeat 
Selwyn House 2-1 in a well fought struggle for victory. October 5th, 
1963 is an important date in my life, for that last nunute goal, unexpected 
as it was, gave us the victory. 

Tony Farrugi a— Captain 



UNDER 12 SOCCER 

It was a pleasant surprise for me, a new boy at Ashbury, to be made 
Captain of the Under 1 2 Soccer for the annual games against Sedbergh. 
As I was told that it was an unusual honour, I decided to do my best for 
the team and the School. Sharing the honours was a satisfactory result, 
for we do enjoy those annual fixtures against Sedbergh. 

Colin Cann— I\" 




UNDER 12 SOCCER TEAM 



1963-1964 



Back R(nv. L. I. H. Spencer, Esq., X. F. Dav. D. B. MacDonald, D. B. Dollin, P. M. 

AIcGuff, G. Hayley, V. P. Hearne, J. A. .McRuer. 
Front Ro-u.-. G. D. Blyth, A. M. Blaumann, C, P. T. Davis, R. P. Cann, Capt., D. C. 

\'ennor-.Morris, I. N. Henrikson. G. E. Rothschild. 



94 THE ASHBU Rl AN 

JUNIOR HOCKEY 

Under 14 Hockey Team 

The season was a very good one as we only lost one game, against 
Lower Canada College, 1-0, Mr. Morgan was our coach this year, and 
helped by Mr. Hillary, he gave us many practices. We defeated Sed- 
bergh the two times we played them. Our star goalie was young 
Richard Wilson. 

Russell Armitage— Captain 
Stewart Dean— Vice-Captain 

Members of the Tea???: W. B. Ducharme, K. B. Kennedy, J. H. Nelms, 
P. Michelson, M. J. Palmer, R. B. Wilson, A. Farrugia, R. H. Armi- 
tage, S. C. Dean, R. A. Ennis-Smith, D. B. MacDonald. 

Hockey Colours awarded to Kennedy and Wilson. 

Honourable Mention to Armitage, Dean, Farrugia, Ennis-Smith and 
Michelson. 



^G^:-0 



Under 1 3 Hockey Team 

This year we were not up to our usual standard as we lost the games 
we played. 

The two outstanding players for our team were Wilson who played 
goalie, and Kennedy who was vice-captain and our key defense man. 

We hope next year we can be at our best with the good coaching of 
Mr. Morgan and win all our games. 

Mev?bers of the Teai??: I. C. Merkley, P. J. Malacarne, G. E. Hayley, 
P. G. Loftus, V. P. Hearne, C.R. P. Cann, M. J. Pahuer, R. B. 
Wilson, K. H. Merkley, A. Farrus^ia, Captain, K. B. Kennedy, 
W. B. Ducharme, D. B. MacDonald." 



THE ASH B U RIAN 



95 



JUNIOR CRICKET XI 

The season started very well for the Junior Cricket Team for we 
were able to beat Bishop's after a very short practice season, due to the 
miserable spring weather. The next game was also at Ashbury, against 
Sedberg^h School. This was a second victory, and we were confident of 
an undefeated season. As you would expect, it was a very happy crowd 
who set off on the annual journey to Lennoxville. However, victory 
was denied us, due to "a tired team which did not have enough sleep" 
(Mr. Spencer's decision). The trip was great, and even though we 
could not win the cup outright, we enjoyed our two days. The final 
game up at Montebello, coming in the middle of the examination turmoil, 
was a relaxino- day. The opposition felt sorry for us, and did not work 
the team too hard. 



UNDER 14 CRICKET TEAM — 1963-1964 

Back Row. A. P. Deutsch, J. M. Cornett, P. G. Loftus, D. R. Moulds, Vice-Cape, 

Armitage, C. R. P. Cann. 
Front Roiv: P. Michelson, S. C. Dean, R. A. Ennis-Smith, A. Farrugia, Capt., 

Espaillat, P., G. E. Hayley. 
In Front: W. R. Harsh. 



R. H. 
A. J. 




96 THEASHBURIAN 

Awards: 

Colours to Tony Farrugia, Captain; Colin Cann, wicket keeper; 
Philip Loftus, the team's bowler. 

iM. C. C. Bat for the Most Improved Player — Colin Cann IV 

Spencer Trophy for the Most Valuable Player — Tony Farrugia 



I 



^G^^O 




UNDER 13 CRICKET TEAM — 1963-1964 

Back Row. B. M. Firestone, A. P. Deutsch, P. G. Loftus, W. R. Harsh, D. A. H. Mac- 

farlane, D. B. Dollin, C. R. P. Cann. 
Front Row. A. M. Blaumann, C, A. D. Gow, N. F. Day, A. Farrugia, Capt., \\'. B. 

Ducharme, A. J. Espaillat, F., G. E. Hayley. 



THE ASHBURIAN yj 

HOUSE AND LEAGUE GAMES 

While every boy may not get onto one of the teams which play 
against other schools, almost every Junior over ten years of age is assigjned 
to one of the intramural teams in soccer and hockey. Here the excite- 
ment and value of competition often approaches that found in our 
external games. 

Soccer. The semi-finals of League play matched W'cjlverhampton 
(1) against Luton (0), and Arsenal (3) against .Manchester (0). The 
final was close and required overtime to give Arsenal the win over 
Wolverhampton, 1-0. 

In House Soccer, x\lexander defeated Connaught 2-0 in the semi- 
finals and went to score ten points for the Wilson Shield by beating 
Woollcombe 3-0. 

Hockey. In the semi-final games, Toronto over Chicago 1-0, and 
Boston over Montreal 3-1. In the final, watched by the entire Junior 
School at the Auditorium, Palmer scored for Toronto to give them the 
win over Boston, 1-0. 

The Gibson Award for the greatest contribution to the National 
Hockey League went to Ennis-Smith. 

This year each House produced a 1st and a 2nd Team. Alexander 
won both series. 

Cricket, ^^'e have no league here, but a healthv^ competition is 
produced in the latter half of the season by matching the worst of the 1st 
Field against the best of the 2nd, the worst of the 2nd Field against the 
best of the 3rd, and so on down the line. 

In House cricket, Alexander was again the winner. This was 
Alexander's year! 



^^^^=10 



98 



THE ASHB URIAN 



THE CHESS TOURNAMENT 

The fifth annual tournament was held during the Winter term with 
the following results: 



TRANSITUS A 



Sharp 

Gow 

B.-B. 

Mirsky 

Firestone 

Cuzner 

Tyas 

Nelms 

Farrugia 



Howes 
Gow 

.Mirsky 

Firestone 

Moulds 

Tvas 



Gow 



Firestone 



> Tyas 



* Firestone 



Weld, I Far.ug.a | ^ 

Espaillat I ■' 



Espaillat I J 



>■ Espaillat I 



Espaillat I 



IIIA 



Barker 

Barnes I 

Copeland 

Day 

Deutsch 

Dollin 

Ellis 

Laidler 

Macdonald II 

Palmer 

Weld II \ 

Blanc j 



Espaillat II 
Barnes I 

Copeland 

Deutsch 

Ellis 

Palmer 

Weld II 
Hearne 



> Espaillat II 
Y Copeland 



Ellis 



Hearne 



Espaillat II 



Hearne 



Espaillat II 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 



99 



IIIB 



Fane 

Hoyt 

Emmons 

AIcRuer 

Blaumann 

Davis 

Macfarlane 

Wilson II 



Hoyt 

McRuer 



Blaur 



Wilson II 



McRi 



A\'ilson II 



.McRuer 



Laflamme 

Gosse 

Knox 

Blvth 

iMcGuff 

Troniak 

Alerklev II 



IIIC 



Blyth 



Gosse 

Blyth 

I McGuff ] 

Alerklev II "\ i McGuff 

VennoZ-AIorris / ^^ennor-Morris J 
Cole 



y Ducharme 
I Rothschild 



Blvth 



Ducharme 

A'enables 1 ^ r" Rothschild 

Rothschild 

U'infield "\ 

MacDonald III f '^^^'^Donald III ^ 

v . ,. ., f AlacDonald III 

Basmski I J 



Rothschild 



Rothschild 



Basinski II 



Basinski II 

Peterson 

Lew \ 

Barnes II / ^""^5 II 

Stewart ~^ 

Pryde | P^^^^^ 

Armitage 1 

Hatch r "^^'^h 



II 



Basinski II 



Hatch 



Hatch 




JUNIOR MONITORS — 1963-1964 

Back Row. P. Michelson, C. J. Sharp, L. S. Nielsen, W. R. Harsh, J. H. Nelms, R. H. 

Armitage. 
Front Row: A. Farrugia, R. A. Ennis-Smith, D. R. Moulds, Wing Cdr., D. L. Polk, Esq., 

A. D. Gow, J. R. M. Tyas, (Chapel), I. G. C. Brodie-Brockvvell, (Librarian). 



OUR LITTLE LEAGUE OF NATIONS 

Some of the Juniors from far-away places were gathered one day 
on the back steps of Argyle for a photo, with the result below. 
Those shown are: 

Back Row. Cann III, U.S.A.; Makonnen, Ethiopia; Rose, Trinidad and 

Tobago; Nielsen, Yukon. 
Middle Row. Farrugia, England; Blanc II, France; Rincon I, Dominican 

Republic; Espaillat I, Dominican Repubhc; Knox, Denmark. 
Front Row. Winfield, Bermuda; Rajadhon, Thailand; Begamudre, India; 

Blaumann II, Mexico. 




T H E ASH BU Rl AN loi 

OUR CLASS TRIP 

On AIny 6th 1964, we started walking down town. \\t walked 
through the official residence and grounds of Governor-General G. P. 
Vanier. Our next stop was at Mr. Polk's house where we met his wife 
and dog. When we arrived at City Hall we were shown the air-con- 
ditioning system at the top of the building. The view of the Ottawa 
River and surrounding area was impressive. We were then shown 
through the council chamber, committee room and the secretarial offices, 
x^s we were leaving we received some pamphlets. We then walked 
down Sussex Drive to the War Museum \\here we saw a field cannon 
(or gun), a German World War II plane, swords, large model of a ship, 
depth mine, a 15th century crossbow and a search Hght. A\'e then went 
to the Archives where we saw an immense model of Quebec CXty, Plains 
of Abraham, etc., and a quite large model of a ship, and some old docu- 
ments. We went to the x\rt Gallery for a quick 20 minute stay. At 
the Chateau Laurier we swam for an hour. Mr. Polk arranged three 
races of which Cuzner, Sharp and Nelms were the winners. In the 
winner's race Nelms came first so he was the all-time champ. After a 
well enjoyed meal at the Honey Dew we saw the 'incredible Mr. 
Limpet" at the Regent. \\'e then took a bus home. 

It was a wonderful day away from school. 

MiRSKY III— Trans A 



IIIC CLASS TRIP 

One afternoon in May, IIIC led by Mr. Sinclair plunged beneath 
the waves of the swimmingr bath at the Chateau Laurier. It was \\-onder- 
ful to think that we were swimming, while the rest of the school were in 
the hot and sticky classroom. It is a fine bath. There is a diving board 
and steps for the less adventurous. Masks and flippers were to be seen. 
Everybody did his best and we all enjoyed it very much. 

Then came the long, hard wait for the call to chow. When the 
moment arrived, a huge thundering sound was heard as IIIC invaded the 
cafe. \\t split up into groups, but whether at small table or large, 
everyone had a big "blow-out", not forgetting a little sugar! 

After lunch we spent our time looking around, having our shoes 
shined or buying candy, until the bus took us back to Ashbury. That 
was one of the best days and meals we have ever had. Thank you Mr. 
Sinclair, 

D. C. \'^ENNOR-.M ORRIS 

Assistant Monitor 
Form IIIC 



102 



THE ASHBURIAN 




FORM NOTES -TRANSITUS A 

Brodie-Brockwell: Gren is always in someone's "doghouse" because 
he won't conform. It has been predicted by a certain master that 
he will walk through Phillips Square (Montreal) in six years time, 
and there will Beeb be sprouting avant garde poetry to his adoring 
fans. While this might make B-B happy, what about his duty to 
Dr. and Mrs. Brodie-Brockwell? 

Cuzner: Charles has now proved to himself that "it can be done" and in 
spite of several rough patches in the early part of the year, he 
finished it a very happy boy. He was even mentioned in the "Top 
Banana Club"! 

EsPAiLLAT I: "Espie" has a running feud with "a certain master", and 
although this takes quite a deal of his time, he did arrange to finish 
well up in the class. He says he won't be back in September. Wq 
shall miss him. 

Farrugia: Every superlative has been exhausted by the Masters when 

referring to Tony, so what can be added that will adequately 

describe this guy? Captain of the Soccer and the Cricket, winner 

of the Form Prize and the proud owner of the AAV)ods Shield for 

1964, the crowning glory^ of his Junior School career. 



THE ASHBURIAN 103 

Firestone: Bruce's chief claim to fame is his running battle with his 
buddy, Farrugia, for the top place in the Form. An inveterate 
worker, and a "trier" on the sports field, he will be a future leader 
of Ashbury in a few short years. 

Gow: Duncan minds his own business and keeps out of all feuds. He 
appears to be content to work hard and always be third to either 
Firestone or Farrugia. Winner of the 1964 Headmaster's Cup, you 
can expect to hear some day that Dune has done something worth- 
while tor Canada — and mankind. 

Howes: Michael "suifers" from being the youngest boy in the class. 
Bur at the same time he is the "oldest" in the number of years spent 
at Ashbury. He has a reasonable knowledge of the year's work, 
and can be expected to do even better as he progresses up the school. 

MiRSKY: Where have I heard, "You untidy brute, Mirsky"! Alike 
believes, along with some famous English professor, that knowledge 
should come first, and tidiness later. His greatest shock this year 
was to make the bottom of the "Top Banana Club" after the Easter 
Exams. 

Moulds: For sheer tenacity and a willingness to work, Don must be 
considered one of the most reliable members of the Form. As well 
as a hard worker in class, he is the inspired Captain of the Under 14 
Soccer, and an excellent cricketer. 

Nelms: John uses his charm to extricate himself from trouble, with 
varying degrees of success. He claims that he tries, and this year 
I am sure that his fellow^ class members would agree. Unfortunately 
he will not be here next vear, and we all wish him well at Fisher. 

Sharp: At the end of the year no boy was happier than Chris when he 
received his results and found he had passed. He had been frantic 
with worr\^ during the first week of June, which is sad because he 
really does want to do w^ell, providing, of course, that it does not 
include too much reading. 

Tyas: One wonders what the antonym for teacher's pet might be. Jamie, 
considered a very nice guy bv his class mates, is accused of being the 
laziest boy in the Junior School by "certain masters unnamed". 
Would you rather work than gaze out the window at the traffic on 
Maple Lane? \\\)rk is for the birds. 

Weld: If ever a boy held the admiration of a whole class, that boy must 
surely be Hugh. Always willing to "have a go", he never shirks 
his turn at any obligation either in the classroom or on the sports 
field. We were all sorry to hear that he is going to High School 
next year, for his cheerful grin and sound common sense will both 
be missed when school reopens. A\'as it coincidence that he sat 
at Mr. Spencer's table for lunch each day? 



104 



THE ASHBURIAN 




TRANSITUS B 



Armitage, Russell — This is his second year at Ashbury. His favourite 
subjects are science and French. He hkes all kinds of sports and 
was on many teams. His favourite master is Mr. Spencer. 

Cann, Temple — My name is Temple Cann III and I come from 
Yonkers, N.Y., U.S.A. I am a yearly boarder at Ashbury. It is 
my first year here and I am accompanied by my three brothers here. 

Carmichael, Allen — My name is Allen Carmichael and this is my 
first year at Ashbury. I've got the nick name of Cars. My 
favourite sport is hockey and my favourite subject is mathematics. 

Cornett, John — I am in the eighth grade in the Junior School. I like 
sports. This is my second year here, and before I came to Ashbury 
I went to Queen Elizabeth. I am going to Ghana this summer to 
see my parents. My best subject is spelling. 

Dean, Stuar r — This is his third year at Ashbury and he seems to like it 
very much. He is very good in hockey, but is a good "all rounder". 
His nick name is Skipper. 

Ennis-Smith, Rod — He is a very good athlete, but he has had a little bit 
of trouble with some good competition. He has many good sub- 
jects and enjoys school. 



TH E AS H B U Rl AN ws 

Harsh, Bill — He is the second r;illesr l)()\- in the Junior School, bur this 
however doesn't seem to atlect his great working ;ibilitv. This year 
will be his hist year, I'm afraid, but ma\ be he'll change his mind. 

LoFTUS, Philip — My name is Loftus and I'm a Limey (not quite as 
atomic as Michelson would wish \<)u to believe). I have been 
attending Ashbury for six years and this is m\ last year in the |unior 
School. My favourite sports are soccer and cricket, and favourite 
subject is history. 

Makonnex, Mike — This is his first year at Ashbury, and he thinks he 
likes it. He is a very good runner and is indeed very popular with 
many people. He hopes he will be returnintj next year. 

Michelsox, Philip — This is his second \'ear at Ashbury and I think he 
likes it. He is a very smart lad and came top of his class. 

NiELSEX, Lee — Lee is the friend of everybody and he has been doing 
fairly well this year. He wants to be a pilot w hen he graduates 
from his school and I think he will make a good one. 

Smith, Rox — This is his first year at Ashbury, and from what 1 hear he 
loves it. He likes sports and his best subjects are all of them. He 
is a very nice guy. 

A'iGDER, David — He likes soccer and baseball. His favourite subjects 
are arithmetic and geography. He came to Ashbur\' in Grade 7. 
He likes everybody in his room. He studies very hard. 

Russell Armitage 



llIA 

Barker, Jeremy — Ski jumping is it Jerry! and cricketl ^ ou're one of 
the types that wants to break his leg. Science he enjoys, and the 
curly blonde boy says that he wants to be a family M.D. 1 think 
you had better work harder. Good luck! 

Barnes, Charles — A dashing playful little fellow at tw^elve years of age, 
he is doingr very well for himself. Subjects of all kinds don't exact- 
ly agree with him, but he is mighty keen with a cricket bat. I le 
likes soccer. A little more practice and he'll make it. Four years 
he has been at Ashbur\-, but he hasn't made his mind up \\hat he 
wants to be. 1 wish \ ou good luck. 

CoPELAXD, Stephex — Hc sccms to get along with the boys the five 
years he's at Ashbury. His hobbies are girls and art. He seems 
better in Latin, French and Science than in any other subjects. 
Football, hocke\- and baseball are his favourite games. He wants to 
follow in his father's footsteps to be a contractor. He had better 
sharpen up on his arithmetic. 



106 



THE ASHBURIAN 




Day, Nicky — He has been here for three years and he seems sure of him- 
self. Being a veterinarian is not an easy job but he'll probably be a 
good one. Spelling and geography are his subjects. He likes foot- 
ball and swimming. Sure hope he doesn't go to the dogs! 

Deutsch, Andy — Where is the cleverness in him besides English, history 
and science? It's in baseball, cricket and soccer where he was 
assistant captain. He has a lot of friends. In the four years attend- 
ing Ashbury he's been vi'ondering how good a flyer he is going^ to be. 
He has certainly done well as our Form Monitor. 5sice work, 
Andy! 

DoLLiN, David — He has attended Ashbury four years and he likes his- 
tory, arithmetic and science, which he finds interesting. He is 
active in soccer and cricket, making both teams. Fine work as an 
assistant monitor. He hopes to be a scientist. 

Ellis, Mark — History and English are his main subjects in the five years 
he has been here. He likes cricket and hunting as his sports. 
Also fishing. He hopes to be a lawyer. 

EsPAiLLAT, Rafael— Three years the httle Spanish Brain has been 
attending Ashbury. The phrase "brain" is meant because he is a 
ten year old Spanish boy and already in Grade 7. History and 
algebra are his favourite subjects. He enjoys cricket and baseball, 
and during the later years of his life he hopes to be an engineer. 



THEASHBURIAN 107 

Hearne, Victor— The old rimer lias been at Ashbiir\' for seven years, 
and English, geography and arithmetic are his subjects. Look at 
that trout as he reels it in, carr\ing on his favourite sport, fishinij. 
Playing on a soccer team he must be pleased. He intends to be a 
lawyer. 

Laidler, Jim — Latin and history go well w ith Jim in the six years he has 
been here. He likes cricket and baseball. He hopes to be a success- 
ful scientist. 

Macdoxald, Doug — Skiing, fishing and riding are important as far as 
DouCT is concerned. Three years he has been here, and he likes 
algebra, history and spelling. He's hoping to be successful in life 
and own a line of hotels and restaurants. 

Palmer, Mike — Mike is a boy who always wants to go into sports. He 
likes football and baseball. He also likes music and English litera- 
ture. Three years he's been attending, and he wants to be a lawyer, 
I think. Well at this present time I don't think he knows what he 
wants to be. 

Weld, Jim — During the two years he's been here he has hked arithmetic, 
algebra and football. He's a tall lad and hopes to be an engineer. 

Blanc, Philippe — Phihppe came from France. He's 12 years old and 
only comes to Ashbury in the afternoons. He likes baseball and 
history and geography. He is also a great help in our French 
classes. Career not vet kno\\n. 

IIIB 

Blaumann, Alfredo — This is my second year at Ashbury and 1 like it 
very much. I'm from X^enezuela and over there we don't have 
snow and last year was my first time to see it. 1 like the sports of 
Ashbury very much but especially hockey. My best subjects are 
History and French. The master that I like the best in class is Mr. 
Sinclair and the one that I Hke the best up in the Wing is Mr. 
Gillean. I wish to be an architect. 

Davis, Peter — He was one of the "Brains" of the class and got an MLTS. 
This was his first year at Ashbury and he enjoN'ed himself very nmch 
playing games, and sometimes playing games in the classroom. He 
was promoted during the year in Latin and French. 

Emmons, Lee — This is my first year at Ashburw 1 like it here because 
of our extra sports. My favourite sport is football, and my best 
subjects are Latin and algebra. 

Fane, Frank — I live in \^egreville. Alberta and 1 came to Ashbury after 
Christmas this year. \"egreville is 56 miles from Edmonton. 

Henrikson, Ian — I live in Kingston, Ontario. The school I went to 
before I came to Ashbury was Duncan McArthur. When 1 grow 
up 1 am going to be a pilot, a lawyer or a store manager. 



108 THEASHBURIAN 

HoYT, Ted — He came to Ashbury in September. He has had a pretty 

good time at school, sometimes too good a time in the classroom. 

Even though he gets into mischief the masters (some of them) like 

him. He likes to make things. 
Kennedy, Keltie — He finally passed his arithmetic and Mr, Hillary was 

very pleased. So was Keltie! He was the star of the hockey team 

and has had quite a good first year at i\.shbury. 
Macfarlane, Damd — This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it here 

a lot. I am going to England next year. I like soccer and cricket 

and I was on the Teams. I hope to go to the Royal Military College 

and go into the Air Force. 
Malacarne, Peier — This is my first year at Ashbury. The school I 

went to before I came here was St. Peter's in Toronto. When I get 

older I hope to be a hockey player. 
iMcRuER, John — This is my first year at Ashbury and an interesting one. 

I am a member of the choir and my favourite sports are soccer and 

cricket. My best subject is science. 
RiNCON, Alberto — He is the artist of the Form. He has also worked 

very hard during the year and learned a lot of English. He likes 

the school including the sports. 
Turner, Don — This is my third year at i\shbury and I hope to be a 

chemist. 
Wahn, Ian — I used to go to Deer Park School in Toronto. My favour- 
ite sport is swimming. I enjoy art a lot, but my favourite subject is 

English composition. Some of my friends call me "Bubbles". 
Wilson, Richard — This is my second year at Ashbury College. I like 

the School very much. I wish to be a History and Latin teacher. 

FORM IIIC 
Basinski, Stefan — He is a hard worker and also likes to play cricket. 

He is already learning some algebra and will be well prepared when 

he takes this subject in Grade VII next year. 
Bissonnet, Richard — This is his first year at x\shbury. He is a neat 

writer and was one of the four boys in the Form to get an MLTS. 

Sometimes he does not pay attention in class. 
Blyth, C^raham — This is my second year here. I am ten years old and 

am in Grade VI. This summer I plan to go to my cottage on the 

Rideau Lake. I plan to return next year. 
Cann, Colin — I am a "Yankee". I live in New York City, U.S.A. 

This is my first year at Ashbury and my favourite sport is Track and 

Field. 
Cochrane, Terry — This is my third year at Ashbury. I like skiing and 

canoeing. History is my favourite subject. 



I 



THE ASH li U Rl A S 109 

Cole, Dave— I came to Ashburv September 3, 1963. I come from the 
west end of Ottawa. My hobbv is coin collecting and fixing up old 
cars. The sport w hich 1 like most is water skiinj;. I do not like 
Ashburv too much. 

Coi.BERi, Brlce — He is a good student and is liked bv the bovs. He 
likes all sports. I le is serious and pa\s attention in class. 

Dent, John — This is n\\ third \'car at Ashburv College. \\\ favourite 
subjects are English and geographw I am hoping to be a scientist. 

DucHARME, W'amy — I would like to be an animal doctor. I am in 
Grade \'I, and I like fishing and hunting. I have been here five 
years and I like to play hockey and all the games. 

GossE, Bill — He has been at Ashbury a long time. Sometimes he gets 
into mischief but it is not serious. He sirs up in front in class and 
tries to pay attention. 

Knox, John — I was born in France; my first language was German, and 
I am Danish. I want to be an engineer. I have travelled many 
places over the world. 

Laflamme, David — This is my third year at Ashbury College. I enjoy 
it here and I hope that I can come back next year. When I grow 
up I hope to be a doctor or an engineer. 

.Macdonald, Johnny — This is my fourth year at Ashburw \\\ favour- 
ite sports are swimming, cricket and water skiing. I like French 
and Latin. I hope to be a doctor or an engineer in the anny and to 
travel, but I want to always keep my friends at Ashbury. 

McGuFF, Paul — I am an American. This is my second year at Ash- 
bury. I joined the Boy Scouts and have been on some trips. \\'hen 
I grow up I will be a doctor. 

Merkley, Ian — I came to Ashbury in September and like the grounds 
and schooling very much. Aly favourite sports here are football 
hockey baseball, cricket and track and field. 1 also like soccer. 
I am 12 now and have enjoyed the year. 

Merkley, Kenneth — I am Merkley I. This is my second year at 
Ashbury. My favourite sports are hockey and football. This 
summer we are s^oing to our cottage at Constance Bay. 

Reid, Ronald — I came here from F^lmdale Public School. My favourite 
master is Mr. Spencer and my favourite subject is Latin. I became 
very popular in the Junior School during January. 

RiNCON, Jose — This is my second year attending Ashbury and I like it 
very much and I am very proud of it. My name is Jose de Calasanz 
Guillemio \'icente Antonio Rincon de la Ma/.a. I am from the 
Dominican Republic and I am learning how to speak Lnglish in this 
beautiful country and I think I am doing pretty well. 



no THEASHBURIAN 

Rothschild, George — My favourite master is Mr. Spencer, He was 
my English teacher. He was strict but he got what he wanted into 
my skull. I only stayed at Ashbury for one year. I will have to 
say good bye to a lot of my friends. 

Stead, Martin — I came to Ashbury on April 1st. I like Ashbury 
because it is so interesting and also because the masters are so nice 
but do they make one work! 

Troniak, Matthew — I was born in Winnipeg. I am very intelligent 
and self-romancing, and of great understanding. In the future I 
would like to be an engineer and scientist. 

Venables, Michael — This is my second year at Ashbury. My favour- 
ite subject is spelling and my favourite sport is the high jump. 

Vennor-Morris, David — I was born on June 24th, 1953. I weigh 86 
pounds, and am four feet and ten inches. My favourite sports are 
skiing, skating, swimming and fishing. When I grow up I want to 
be a scientist. My favourite subjects are Latin and spelling. I am 
a Canadian. 

WiNFiELD, Michael — This is my second year here. Next year I will be 
going to a school in England. My favourite sports are cricket and 
soccer. I hope to be a Doctor after my father. My home is in 
Bermuda. 

FORM II 

Armitage, Mark — This is my fourth year at Ashbury. I like it very 

much. My aim is to be a medical doctor. 
Barnes, xAIichael — I enjoy coming to Ashbury. When I grow up I 

will be a veterinarian. 
Basinski, Stefan — This is my fourth year here. I have liked Ashbury 

ever since I came. We have games here. When I grow up I 

expect to be a medical doctor. 
BouNSALL, Philip — This is my first year at Ashbury. My most favour- 
ite sport is basketball and my hobby is playing with electric cars. 

My aim is to be a lawyer. 
Braathen, Ricky — This is my first year at Ashbury and Tm glad to say 

that I have enjoyed every bit of it here. My hobby is making 

rhymes. When I grow up I will be a scientist. 
Dalton, Donald — I have only been at Ashbury for a few months. I 

like it here. A4y home is in Newfoundland. When I grow up I 

hope to be a policeman. 
Hart, Bill — This is my first year at Ashbury College and I have enjoyed 

it very much. I did not know how to pia\- cricket when I came 

here, but now cricket is my favourite sport. A\'hcn I grow up I 

would like to be a scientist like my father. 



7' HE ASH B U RI AN 



111 



I 




Hatch, Donald — This is mv fourth vear at Ashbury. The subjects I 
hke best are history, speUing and arithmetic. My favourite sport is 
soccer. During the hohdays we might be going to Trenton. 
When I grow up I hope to be a detective. 

Hayley, Greg — I go to Ashbury College. 1 have been attending Ash- 
bury for four years. I like cricket ver\^ much. 

Kronick, Ricky — This is my third year at Ashbury. When I grow up 
I hope to be a doctor. My hobbies are swimming and skiing. I 
enjoy them very much. 

La Ferme, Leo — This is my fifth year at Ashbury. My home is in 
Montreal. I hope to be a lawyer when I grow up. My best sub- 
ject is music. I like skiing very much. In the summer I ^o to 
Camp Ka^^'abi. 

Levy, Eric — This is my second year at Ashbiu*y and I hope it will not 
be the last. I have had a very good teacher, ^^'hen I grow up I 
will be a surgeon. 

Osmond, Paul — This is my first year at Ashbury. I arri\ed in Novem- 
ber from Ghana in Africa. I think I will enjoy myself here. It was 
much hotter in Africa and I only went to school in the mornings. 
The afternoon was too hot. I have more fun here. 

Perley, Rickie — My aim is to stay at Ashbury. I like it here very 
much. I hope to be an insurance man and to help an\'body in any 
way I can. 



1 1 



112 THEASHBURIAN 

Peterson, David — This is my third y^ear at Ashbury and I have learned 

a qreat deal of things. After we have lunch we have games, soccer, 

hockey or cricket. It depends on the season. 
Polk, Nicky — I would like to be a private detective when I grow up. 

Aly favourite sport is football. This is mv second year at Ashbury. 

I like old things best, 
Pryde, Derek — This is my fourth year at x\shbury. I am very fond of 

it. AIv^ hobby is writing. Aly best subject in school is speUing. 

I also like baseball. 
Rajadhon, George — I came to Ashbury this year on Feb. 28, 1964. I 

like s;-ames and arithmetic best. Aly mother and father and I come 

from Thailand. I have been in New York three years before I came 

to Canada. 
Smallwood, Sandy — This is my first year at Ashbury, and I am enjoy- 
ing it ver\^ much. When I grow up I would like to be a naval 

officer, 
Stewart, Richard — This is my second year in Ashbury. AVhen I grow 

up I would like to be a scientist. My favourite sports are soccer, 

skiing and diving. 
Wilson, Rob — This is my fifth year at Ashbury College. I Hke soccer 

and cricket very much, and history is my best subject. When I 

grow up I want to be a naval architect. 
Wilson, Brian — I like sports, especially running and high jumping. I 

am going to be a R.C.M.P. officer. 

FORM I 
Ames — Joe wants to be a train engineer. 
Baxter — Geoffrey wants to be a doctor and study at McGill. 
Begamudre — VB wants to be a writer. We are sure he will be a good 

one. 
Ellis — Jody would like to be a Mountie, 
Boyd — Trevor tells us that he will be a policeman. 
Craston — Nicholas would like to help people and says that he will be a 

doctor. 
Mangifesta — Pierre is one of the best of our young athletes and wants 

to play football. 
Rose — Peter wants the best of two worlds. He wants to be a doctor for 

the Mounties. 
Stilborn — Scott is going into the amiy ^here he will be a great success. 
Taticek — Peter is a serious one and wants to be a lawyer. 

Tench — Graham wants to be an artist. Whatever he does will be well 

done. 
Wood — Anthony will be a fire chief some day. 



THE ASH li U HI A N 775 

A GIFT FOR MOTHER 

School WHS over for Friday at four o'clock. I felt m\' fifteen cents 
hopping up and down as I myself was jumping up and dow n. Fhen 1 
found my friend in the same mood with fifty cents in his pocket. 

The next minute we were flying across the tunnel leading to the 
Senior School where the Tuck Shop and Dining Room stand. Of course 
the Senior School is there, too. Just when I was going to step into the 
Tuck Shop, my friend said how about the Mothers' (Juild Sale in the 
Dining Room. Then we both ran up the stairs and into the Dining 
Room. 

There I waited for half an hour. Then 1 bought a flower ashtray. 
When 1 asked the lady how nmch it was, she said that she could bankrupt 
me from 25 cents to 15 cents. And so 1 bought it for fifteen cents. 

Bega.mudre— Form I 

SPARE TIME 

Everyone knows how much spare time we haxe at Ashbury, so 
when the homework load is heaviest, I decide to skip it all and use the 
spare time doing experiments in my lab in the basement. All over the 
walls are cupboards filled with chemicals, and this is much more fascinat- 
ing than Latin or Algebra homework. As 1 look at the many glass tubes, 
beakers, and stands I wonder what experiment 1 can do this time, at 
the same time covering up in case mv parents become interested. Why, 
I even forget about the trouble that is waiting for me the next day, and 
the telephone calls to my dad from an angry teacher. 

I could list some of my experiments, but some grown-up might think 
it is dangerous, and that would be the end of my spare-time-fun. It is 
a good thing— I say! —to have an all absorbing hobby, and one day I 
shall have a First in Grade XIII Chemistry. 

Dancf.rous Don Turnkr, 
Form IIIB. 

MY MARVELOUS TOY 

Oh, when I was a little boy 
I had a very marvelous toy. 
I laughed at it for very joy 
But my mother and father it did annoy. 
When I was sick I played with it. 
I was happ\' even in bed to sit. 
Whenever I saw it with glee I lit; 
And so about m\' toy I've writ. 
The marvelous to\- that with glee 1 lit. 
Boom! ! 

Iw Mfrkt IV— I lie 



114 T HE ASHBU Rl AN 

THE SLUGGER 

It was silent in the pitch that day. Deathly silent. The crowd 
was waiting. For I — Brodie-Brockwell — alias the Slugger was coming 
up to bat. I strode proudly into the pitch and took my position at the 
wickets. The bowler, trembling with fear, glanced around, then began 
his run and bowled. I swung back, and connected. You could hear 
the distinct "crack" everywhere. The crowd roared. So did the um- 
pire, "Out!" 

For, yo" see, I had actually clobbered my wickets. 




THE THRILL OF IT ALL 

Finally the day in May comes when you find out if you have got 
your iVI.L.T.S. These initials stand for Aiichelmas, Lent, Trinity 
Standings. It means for me that I do not have to write my final 
examinations. 

The five minutes before they are read off are the worst. You are 
wondering if you got one. You say that you have not and every one is 
telling you that you have. It takes a long time for the names to be read. 
Mr. Polk reads slowly with lots of pauses and sometimes makes funny 
comments. He read off my name and I jumped up and down. 

The second thrill is when everybody is ^^Titing examinations and you 
are: 

1. Playing baseball. 4. Seeing a movie. 

2. Playing cricket. 5. Sun bathing. 

3. Swimming. 6. Doing nothing. 

At night you are allowed to stay outside and while the others are in 
prep. Then in the morning you don't have to get up carh^ for that last 
minute studying. 

P.S. Pardon me for being conceited; it onlv^ happens once a year. 

A. Farrugta— Trans A 



THEASHBURIAN in 

MY COURAGE 

On my last birthday I was given a tent. This pleased me and I was 
determined to sleep out. I begged and begged and finally stained mv 
mother's permission. 1 had boasted of mv^ courage but I must confess 
my courage waned thin as the thunder clapped and the lightening bolted 
and the thought of countless horror movies ran throucjh mv mind, but I 
could not give up now so I decided to see it throuoh. 

After about an hour I fell into a troubled slumber only to awaken 
from it several hours later. I could not get back to sleep so I sat up and 
thought pleasant thoughts. 

It was a pale and tired me who finally knocked at the front door 
about seven in the morning. 

.My little brother crowed but as he had not wanted to come out it 
didn't bother me. I made a resolution that next time I would listen to 
the weather forecast. 

P. LOFTUS 

.MURDER AT .MIDNIGHT 

"It's him or me now, John, there's nothing else to do." Arnold 
Fletcher's voice trembled with nen^ousness as he spoke into the tele- 
phone. He looked uneasily over his shoulder, but he was alone in the 
little crrocery shop. The "Open" sign on the door was facing inwards. 
Through the window he could see the fog surrounding the street light 
in a yellow cloud. 

"I can't let it g;o on any longer, you know how much he's taken from 
us these last few weeks and his kind will never leave you alone until 
they've got almost everv^thing. He'll be here tonight for more, but I'll 
stop him this time." 

"It's no good John" he sighed, "my mind is made up. Even if I did 
report it to the police, think of the risk if it leaked out. It would put us 
out of business. I'll be careful, don't worry." 

He hung up slowly and put his white apron behind the counter. 
Then he went out into the back yard and picked up an old pick-axe off 
the junk pile, pried up a stone and began to dig. The axe will serve tAvo 
purposes, he thought, as he knocked the head from the handle and walked 
into the shop with it. 

Crouched behind the counter, with the lights out and the blind 
down, only a faint bit of light came through — just enough for his pur- 
pose. He thought about his brother's worried voice over the telephone. 
John seemed to think he was mad, but he had thought it out right. A 



116 THEASHRURIAN 

gun was out of the question with people hving above the shop, and speed 
was necessary. 

A sHght sound by the door interrupted him. \\'as it ... ? Yes — 
in the faint Hght he could just make out a dark shape moving slowly 
towards the end of the counter where the cash register was. 

He jumped forward, the wooden axe handle whizzing through the 
air. There was a soft scream that died away with a second blow. 

He had done it. Now there was only the body to dispose of, then 
he could go home and tell John that it was finished. 

Picking up the lifeless body, he carried it quickly^ to the back yard 
and dropped it into the previously dug grave — the biggest rat he had 
ever seen! 



^G^O 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 



in 



SCHOOL ROLL 



Abold, C— 2294 Laird Blvd., Montreal. 
Allm.-vrk, B. G.— 215 Springfield Rd., Ottawa 2. 
Ames, R. J. — 12 Lambton Ave., Ottawa 2. 
Anderson, A. \\'. — 2 Maple Lane, RockclifFc Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Anketell-Jones, p. .M. — "Ajavs", 45 Eardlcv Rd., 

Aylmer, P.Q. 
Armm a(;k, M. M. G. — Shaw villc, Quebec. 
Armitack, R. H. — 186 Strathcona Drive, Mount 

Royal, Quebec. 
Ar.mitage, M. H. — 159 Laval St., Ottawa 7. 
Ashe, .M. R.— P.O. Box 303, R.R. Xo. 1, Ottaw a. 
.\tack, D. .M. — 300 Cooper St., Ottawa. 
Atack, J. F. G. — 300 Cooper St., Ottawa. 
Albrev, G. B.— 290 Sandridge Road, Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 

Barber, G. D. — 4866 Cote des Xeiges No. 12, 

Montreal. 
Barker, J. S. — 12 Aliddleton Drive, Lindenlea, 

Ottawa. 
B.\RNES, C. L. — 7 Star\vood Ave., Ottawa 5. 
Barnes, M. L. \^'. — 7 Starwood Ave., Ottawa 5. 
Basinski, S. L. H.— Box 589, R.R. No. 1, Rothwell 

Heights, Ottawa. 
Basinski, A. S. H.— Box 589, R.R. No. 1. Rothwell 

Heights, Ottawa. 
Baxter, G. — 37 Charles Street, Avlmer, P.Q. 
Begamudre, V. — 50 Selkirk Ave., Eastview, Ont. 
Benskin, G. R. — 109 Regent Road, St. Lambert, 

P.Q. 
Berry, B. J. — 165 Glenoarrv Ave. Town of Mount 

Royal, P.Q. 
BiROL-, .M.— P.O. Box 2886, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 

East Africa. 
BissoNNET, R. L. — 14 Crescent Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Blanc, O. J. — 243 Hemlock Rd., Ottaw a. 
Blanc, P. M. M.— 243 Hemlock Rd., Ottaw a. 
Blaumann, J. — Ave. Thiers No. 41-1, Colonia 

Nueva Anzures, Mexico, D.F. 
Blau.mann, a. — Ave. Thiers No. 41-1, Colonia 

Nueva Anzures, Mexico, D.F. 
Blyth, G. D.— 231 Buena Vista Ave., Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Booth, \V. J.— 711 Manor Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
BovNSALL, p. A. — 319 Island Park Drive, Ottawa. 
Brodie-Brockwell, L G. C. — 102 Brentwood Rd., 

Beaconsfield, P.Q. 
Blrritt, E. F. — 190 Acacia Ave., Ottaw a. 
Bovi), T. D.— Suite 2103, 10 Huntlev St., Toronto. 



Cartman, S. C— Box 488, 59 Wolfe Ave., \'al 

D'Or, P.Q. 
Cartman, J.— Box 488, 59 Wolfe Ave., \'al D'Or 

P.Q. 
Chanti.er, R. S. — Teniiscaming, Quebec. 
Chown, C— 195 Poyntz Ave., Willowdale, Ont. 
Cochrane, T. J.— 376 Island Park Drive, Ottawa. 
Colbert, B. E.— 537 Dovercourt Ave., Ottawa. 
Coi e, D. T.— 540 Golden Ave., Ottawa. 
CoLLVER, C— 328 Perrault St., Rosemere, P.Q. 
Cook, J. G. — Canadian Embassy, 22 Zitelmanstrasse, 

Bonn, W. Germany. 
Cook, K. .\L — Canadian Embassy, 22 Zitelman- 
strasse, Bonn, W. (lernianv. 
Cooper, B. J.— 20 Fairhill Cres., Box 948, R.R. No. 

3, .Manordale, Ottawa 2. 
CoPELAND, S.— 489 Acadia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa. 
Cornett, J. .M.— Canadian High Commission, P.O. 

Box 1639, Accra, Ghana. 
Cotton, J. M. — Ml Mansfield Ave., Ottawa 13. 
Cowley, R. H. — Shaw ville, Quebec. 
Clwlming, I. T. W.— 2002 Alta \'ista Dri\e, 

Ottaw a 8. 
Currie, A. W. — 204 Maple Lane, Ottawa 2. 
CuzNER, C. W.— 1080 Castle Hill Cres., Ottawa 3. 

Ont. 
Campbell, H. R.— R.R. No. 2, Aylmer, P.Q. 
Campbell, T.— R.R. No. 2, Aylmer. P.Q. 
Campbell, L A. G. — 904 Champlain Towers, 200 

Rideau Terrace, Ottawa 2. 
Cann, p. T. G. p.— Box 1692, Lenox, Mass., U.S.A. 
Cann, W. H. B.— Box 1692, Lenox, Mass., U.S.A. 
Cann, T. H. A.— Box 1692, Lenox, Mass., U.S.A. 
Cann, C. R. P.— Box 1692, Lenox, Mass., U.S.A. 
Carmichael, A. H. — 1316 Dewier Ave., Ottawa 8. 
Craston, N. G. N. — Chateau Laurier Hotel, 

Ottawa. 

Davies, V. S.— 49 Rebecca Cres., P.O. Box No. 1, 

Ottawa. 
Davis, P. T. — 37 Lakeside Ave., Ottawa 1. 
Davold, M. G. — 230" Orlando Ave., Ottawa 8. 
Dawson, P. J.— 27 llkley Cres., Manordale, R.R. 

No. 3, Ottawa. 
Day, S. B.— 15 U'estward Way, Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Day, N. F.— -15 Westward \\ay. Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Deacon, B. L. — 31 Russell Ave., Ottawa 2. 
Dean, R. C. — 261 Bcssborough Drive, Toronto 17, 

Ont. 



lis 



THE ASH B U Rl AN 



Dent, J. E.— 468 Piccadilly Ave., Ottawa. 
Deutsch, a. a.— 191 Thompson Blvd., Montreal 9. 
DoDDs, J. R.— 23 Brock Ave., S., Montreal West, 

P.Q. 
DoLLiN, D. B. — 6 Elmdale Ave., Ottawa 2. 
Driedger, T. N. — 129 Helena St., Ottawa. 
DucHARME, W. B. — Faircrest Apts., Riverside Dr., 

Ottawa. 
Dyson, T. P. G.— 31 Birch Ave., Manor Park, 

Ottawa 7. 

Ellis, M. H.— 38 Charles St., Ottawa. 

Ellis, J. R.— 38 Charles St., Ottawa. 

Emmons, W. A. — 23 Parker Ave., Ottawa 5. 

Emmons, L. H. — 23 Parker Ave., Ottawa 5. 

Ennis-Smith, R. a.— 14 Aberfeldy St., Ottawa 6. 

EsPAiLLAT, A.— Apt. 804, 124 Springfield Rd., Ot- 
tawa 2. 

EsPAiLLAT, R. A.— Apt. 804, 124 Springfield Rd., 
Ottawa 2. 

Evans, J. S. — 20 Clemow Ave., Ottawa 1. 

EwiNG, H. B.— 368 Lisgar Road, Rockcliffe Park, 
Ottawa 2. 

Fane, F. W. J.— Box 808, Vegrevillc, Alberta. 
Farrugia, a. — "Highlands", Cuddington Way, 

Cheam, Surrey, England. 
Firestone, B. M. — 375 Minto Place, Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Fisher, J. D. — 81 Drouin St., Eastview, Ont. 
Flynn, T. R.— Box 40, R.R. No. 1, Ottawa, Ont. 
Fuller, T. S. — 313 Acadia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 

Gamble, D. A. P. — 67 First St., Kirkland Lake, Ont. 
Garnett, J. R. S. — 724 Lonsdale Rd., Ottawa 7. 
Garton, G. R.— 95 Placel Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
GoLDiNG, J. M.— 1029 Tower Rd., Halifax, N.S. 
GoLDiNG, P. D.— 1029 Tower Rd., Halifax, N.S. 
Goodwin, D. J. — 32 Arundel Ave., Manor Park, 

Ottawa 7. 
Gosse, W. — 801 Champlain Towers, 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa 2. 
Gow, D. a. — 82 Kenilworth St., Ottawa. 
Grant, C. H. C— 152 Minto Place, Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Gr.\y, N. G. — 546 Broadview Ave., Ottawa 3. 

Hasse, G. a. — 1183 Agincourt Rd., Ottawa. 
Haddad, H. B. — 123 Adie St., Sudbury, Ont. 
Hall-Brooks, R. H.— 1522 Weyburn St., Ottawa 8. 
Hammond, R. H. — Sunny Brae, Lefann St., 

Hamilton, Bermuda. 
Harsh, W.— 65 Hutchinson Ave., Ottawa. 
ILvrcH, D. W. — 165 Camelia Ave., Manor Park, 

Ottawa. 
Hayley, D. a. — 67 Geneva St., Ottawa 2. 
Hearne, J. V. — 18 Maple Lane, Ottawa 2. 
Hearne, p. J. — 18 Maple Lane, Ottawa 2. 



Heeney, p. J.— 99 Lyttleton Gdns., Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Heggtveit, G. — 3061 Otterson Drive, Ottawa 10. 
Henrikson, L N. — 56 Sherwood Drive, Kingston, 

Ont. 
Horner, R. — 257 Kipawa Rd., Temiskaming, P.Q. 
Howes, M. P.— 1248 Evans Blvd., Alta Vista, 

Ottawa. 
Hoyt, J. E.^ — 107 Pickwood Cres., Pointe Claire, 

Quebec. 
Hunt, P. C. — Box 1555, Tehran, Iran. 
Hart, W. B.— Box 111, R.R. No. 1, Hull, Quebec. 
Howard, D. G. — Log Chateau, Seigniory Club, 

Montebello, Quebec. 

Johnson, R. D.— P.O. Box 390, 9 Davidson Drive, 

R.R. No. 1, Ottawa. 
Johnson, H. H.— P.O. Box 390, 9 Davidson Drive, 

R.R. No. 1, Ottawa. 
Johnston, B. T. — 34 Via Bergognone, Milan, Italy. 

Keeper, B. G. — 82 Ethel St., Sioux Lookout, Ont. 
Kennedy-, K. B. — 1193 Woodside Drive, Ottawa 5. 
Kenny, J. A.— P.O. Box 399, Buckingham, P.Q. 
Knox, J. — 451 Daly Ave., Ottawa. 
Koussaya, R. a. G. — 7245 Des Erables Ave., 

Montreal. 
Kronick, R.-^544 Dovercourt Ave., Ottawa. 
Kolonel, iM. D. — 23 Lincoln Rd., Grand Falls, 

Nfld. 

LaFerme, L. S. — 420 Bourke Ave., Dorval, Que. 
Laflamme, D. W. — 266 Clemow Ave., Ottawa. 
Laflamme, D. S. — 266 Clemow Ave., Ottawa. 
Laidler, J. R. — 39 Lambton Ave., Ottawa 2. 
Lash, R. A. — 6666 Fielding Ave., Apt. 609, 

Montreal. 
Lawson, O. K. — 17 Summit Ave., Sault Ste. Marie, 

Ont. 
Leadman, a. S. — 66 Fentiman Ave., Ottawa 1. 
Leadingham, J. D. — 2276 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa. 
Levine, I. M. — 281 University Ave., Fredericton, 

N.B. 
Levy', E. M. — 208 Clemow Ave., Ottaw a. 
Livingstone, G. B.— P.O. Box 1500, \'al D'Or, Que. 
LoFTus, P. G.— P.O. Box 185, 1385 First St., Beulah, 

Michigan, U.S.A. 
Love, D. G.— 277 Hamilton Blvd., Rosemere, P.Q. 
Lynn, E. L. — 452 Roxborough Rd., Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 

Macdonald, J. G. — 403 Champlain Towers, 200 

Rideau Terrace, Ottawa 2. 
jMacdougall, a. D. — 1601 Athlone Rd., Town of 

Mount Royal, P.Q. 
Macfaruane,' D. a. H.— 1586 Pullen Ave., Ottawa. 
Mackenzie, I. D. — 181 Morrison Ave., Town of 

Mount Royal, P.Q. 
Maclaren, b. H. — P.O. Box 30, Buckingham, Que. 
Makonnen, a. Y. M. — Jubilee Palace, Addis Ababa, 

Ethiopia. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



119 



.Malacarne, p. J. — 260 Lippincott St., Toronto 4, 

Ont. 
.Mengasha, M. L. — Alakallc, ligrc, L'.thiopia. 
Mangifesta, p. — 64 East Ave., Brantford, Out. 
.Mathieu, R. — 20 Appleford Ave., Cardinal Heiglus, 

Ottawa 9. 
Merklev, K. H. — f25 Simpson Rd., Ottawa 1. 
AIerkiJ'^v, I. C. — 3657 Revelstoke Drive, Ottawa 10. 
.Metcaife, R. a. — 1006 Rivcrdalc Ave., Cornwall, 

Ont. 
.MicHEi-SON, P. — 50 Cliiirchill Ave., Alassena, N.V., 

U.S.A. 
Millar, R. J. — 92 Front Street, Sioux Lookout, 

Ont. 
AliRSKV, P. S. — ".Marchniont", RockclifFe Part, 

Ottawa 2. 
AliRSKV, P. G. — "Alarchmont", RockclifFe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
AIiRSKY, AI. R. — "Alarchmont", Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
AloQUETTE, L. H.— 1519 Pine Ave., Apt. 4, Alontreal 

6. 
AIosHER, AI. \V. — \ Putman Ave., Ottawa. 
AlouLDS, D. R. — 296 Sherwood Drive, Ottawa 3. 
AluL.'VNER, D.— 603 Redpath Apts., 1460 AIcGregor 

St., Alontreal. 
AIuLANER, J. — 603 Redpath Apts., 1460 AIcGregor 

St., Alontreal. 
AluNRO, C. B. — 235 Broadview Drive, Pembroke, 

Ont. 
AIacDonald, T. L. — 377 Alaple Lane, Ottawa 2. 
.M.\cDoNALD, D. B.— R.R. No. 3, Alanotick, Ont. 
ALacKenzie, W. T. — 216 Parkview Hill Cres., 

Toronto, Ont. 
AIacLaren, J. G.— Box 149, Buckingham, P.Q. 
AIacPhail, p. E.— 254 Alain St., Alaniwaki, Que. 
AIacTavish, D. K.— 280 Thorold Road, Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
AIcAninch, L. V. H. — 1833 Riverside Drive, 

Ottawa. 
.McGaughey, D. B. — 203 Ampang Rd., Kuala 

Lumpur, Alalava. 
AIcGuFF, P. A I. —250 Winter Street, Weston 93, 

Alass., U.S.A. 
AIcNair, R. B.— 102 Elm St., R.C.A.F. Station, St. 

Hubert, P.Q. 
AIcRler, J. A. S. — 773 Dunloe Ave., Ottawa. 
AIcQl aig, D. J.— 1702 Dover Rd., Cornwall, Ont. 

Neatbv, a. AI. — 609 Parkdale Ave., Ottawa. 
Nelms, J. H. — 280 Sherwood Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 
Nettletox, H. D. — 29 Sherwood Drive, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Nielsen, L. S. — P.O. Box 100, Whitehorse, Yukon. 
Nixon, T. C. — 105 Lyttleton Gdns., Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 

O'Brien, L. — 334 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa. 
Olsen, R. D. — 45 Drummond St., \\'., Perth, Ont. 



O'Neill, H. B.— 82 Lisgar Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Osmond, P. W. H.— 43 Apt., SO Rideau lerrace, 

Ottawa 2. 

Paimir, AI. J.— 963 Alooney .Ave., Ottawa. 
Pankhlrst, AI. (i. — 1 AIacDonald Ave., Avlmcr, 

P.Q. 
Parker, I. H.— 383 Alaple Lane, Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottaw a 2. 
PArroN, A. G. — Carberryhill, Warwick, Bermuda. 
Peterson, D. — Delong Drive, Box 545, R.R. No. 1, 

Ottawa. 
Poi)HRAi)SKV, A. G. S.— (died December 10th, 1963;. 
Polk, D. C. — 34 Union St., Ottawa. 
Polk, N. — 34 Union St., Ottawa. 
Prokosh, D. J. — 7382 Kildarc Rd., Alontreal 29, 

Que. 
Pryde, D.— 237 Camelia Drive, Alanor Park, Ottawa. 
Pyefinch, H. J.— Apt. 3, 61 Langevin St., Ottawa 7. 
Perley, R. C. — 701 Keenan Ave., Ottawa 13. 

Rawley, K. H. — 265 Daly Ave., Ottawa. 
Raymond, G. E. — 236 Lazard Ave., Town of 

Alount Royal, P.Q. 
Reid, D. a. — 60 John St., Arnprior, Ont. 
Resnik, a. — 103 West St. Stephenville, Nfld. 
Resnik, G. — 103 West St., Stephenville, Nfld. 
RiDDELL, E. a.— P.O. Box L30, St. Andrews, N.B. 
RiNcoN, A. A.— Apt. 602, 85 Range Rd., Ottawa. 
RixcoN, J. G. — Apt. 602. 85 Range Rd., Ottawa. 
Roberts, C. P.— 943 48th Ave., Lachine, Que. 
Robertson, A. — Brucklav Farm, R.R. No. 3, 

Ottawa. 
Robinson, G. B. — 156 York Cres., Rosemere, P.Q. 
Robinson, J. A I. — 1530 Sweet Briar Rd., Gladwyne, 

Pa., U.S.A. 
Rose, P. A. — 359 Buena \'ista Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Anuman-Rajadhon, S. G. — 119 Range Rd., Ottawa. 
RossY, R. — 2325 Fleming Rd., Town of Alount 

Roval, Alontreal 16. 
Rothschild, G. E. — 456 Alaple Lane, Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Roxburgh, D. AL— 19 Whipoorw ill Drive, Box 629, 

R.R. No. 1, Ottawa. 
Reid, R. B. — ^74 Piccadilly Ave., Ottaw a. 

Samples, G. AI. — 136 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Sark, A. J. — 1^7 Alallard Drive, Greenwich, Conn., 

U.S.A. 
Saunders, R. — Apt. 1, Chapleau Ave., Ottawa. 
Scheel, R. W.— Box 38, Arnprior, Ont. 
Schwartzman, H. AI. — 890 Dessane Ave., Quebec. 
S<;oTr, B. J. 470 Acacia Ave., Ottawa 2. 
Sharp, C. J.— 21 Bellevue Cres., Avlmer East, Hull, 

P.Q. 
Shaw, D. A.— 8 Elmdale Ave., Ottawa 2. 
Smpman. I. T.— 2090 Chalmers Rd., Ottawa 8. 



120 



THE ASH B U RI AN 



M 



Shoup, p. R.— Box 30, Forestry Drive, Longlac, 

Ont. 
SiGVAi.DASox, G. E.— c/o Dcpt. of Ext. Aflfairs, East 

Block, Ottawa. 
Sims, N.— 30 Birch Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa 

2. 
Sinclair, I. R.— 306 Brock Ave., Montreal West, 

P.Q. 
SiNci-MR, R. W.— 324 First Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 
S.MALi.iAX, R. M. L.— 526 Mariposa Ave., Rock- 
cliffe Park, Ottawa 2. 
Smali.wood, L. a.— 32 Toronto St., Ottawa. 
Smelue, J. H.— 241, Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Smith, G. D.— 449 McGill St., Hawkesbury, Ont. 
Smith, R. L. — Box 1300, Arnprior, Ont. 
Snelgrove, N. F. — 23 Theresa St., Barrie, Ont. 
SoLCH, R. K.— 690 Cardinal St., St. Laurent 9, P.Q. 
Southam, R. B.— 550 Prospect Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Southam, W. 

Montreal. 
Spence, G. G. 

Ont. 
Stansbury, R. 

Que. 
Steenbakkers, H. — 25 Arnold Drive, Ottawa 6. 
Seenbakkers, J. — 25 Arnold Drive, Ottawa 6. 
Stein, H.— 404 Roger Rd., Ottawa. 
Stevenson, W. J.— P.O. Box 474, Hudson, Que. 
Stewart, R. G. — c/o 246 Kent St., Ottawa. 
Stieborn, D. K. S. — 315 Island Park Drive, Ottawa. 
Stone, C. — 971 Richmond Rd., Ottawa. 
Sveinson, D. G. — Box 1555, Dryden, Ont. 
Spry, D. T.— 54 Park Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa 

2. 

Taschereau, M. a. — 69 Kilbarry Cres., Manor 

Park, Ottawa. 
Taticek, p. — 55 Electric St., Ottawa 2, Ont. 
Tench, C. G.— 224 Powell Ave., Ottawa 1. 
Thuri.ow, J.— 1451 McRobie Ave., Ottawa 8. 



1227 Sherbrooke St. West, 
79 Riordon Ave., Hawkesbury, 
271 Florian St., Rosemere, 



L. J. 



Thurston, P. R. — 793 Hemlock Rd., Manor Park, 
Ottawa 2. 

TiFFT, R. N. — 1354 Cosgrove St., Watertown, N.Y., 
U.S.A. 

Troniak, M. M. L. J. — 140 Helmsdale Ave., Win- 
nipeg 15, .Manitoba. 

Troop, G. O. — 211 Buena \"ista Rd., Rockcliffe 
Park, Ottawa 2. 

Turner, D. G. — 483 Richardson Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Tyas, J. R. M.— 78 Rothwell Drive, Box 498, Box 
No. 1, Ottawa. 

\'enabi.es, At. 551 Fairview Ave., Ottawa 2. 
X'ennor-.Morris, D. C. — 7 Farnham Cres., Ottawa. 
\"iik;er, D. G. — 115 Ruskin St., Ottawa 3. 

Waters, D. H. — 2472 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa. 
Waxman, a. J. — 6370 De Vimy Ave., Montreal. 
Weir, J. T. — Box 152, Masson, Que. 
Weld, W. H. — 318 Fairmont Ave., Ottawa. 
Weld, J. C. M. — 330 Fairmont Ave., Ottawa. 
Wennberg, R. p. — 128 Howick St., Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Wennberg, M. D.— 128 Howick St., Rockcliffe 

Park, Ottawa 2. 
Weymuller, E. — 149 Manor Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
White, G. C— 90 Placel Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 
Wii^oN, R. D.— 814 Alpine Ave., Ottawa 14. 
Wilson, R.^441 Churchill Ave., Ottawa. 
Wilson, B. — 141 Churchill Ave., Ottawa. 
Wilson, R. L.— 280 Park Rd., Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa 2. 

2. 
Wahn, I. G. v.— 62 Heath St., Toronto 7, Ont. 
Winfield, M. J. — Blue Flag, Somerset, Bermuda. 
Wood, A. G. M. — 12 Belvedere Cres., Ottawa 2. 

Zaporski, a. M.— Rua Rodolpho Dantas 26, Apt. 
901, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 



'e^oD 



I 



THEASHBURIAN 121 



EXCHANGES 

The Editor acknowledges with thanks receipt of the following and 
apologizes for any inadvertent omissions. 

Acta RiiileiiTihi, Ridley College, St. Catharines, Ont. 

The MaUmr'urn, .Marlborough College, .Marlborough, Wilts, England. 

The Felstedian, Felsted School, Felsted, Essex, England. 

The Meteor, Rugby School, Rugby, England. 

South African College School Magazine, Orange St., Capetown. 

Trinity University Review, Trinity University, Toronto, Ont. 

The Mitre, Bishop's University, Lennoxville, P.Q. 

Lux Gleho'iia, Glebe Collegiate, Ottawa. 

The Loner Canada College Magazine, .Montreal. 

The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield Preparatory School, Lakefield, Ont. 

The College Times, Upper Canada College, Toronto, Ont. 

Northivood School ALigazine, Northwood School, Lake Placid Club, X.V., U.S.A. 

The Blue and White, Rothesay Collegiate, Rothesay, N.B. 

The Bishop's College School Magazine, B.C.S., Lennoxville, P.Q. 

The Argus, Sault Ste. .Marie Collegiate, Sault Ste. .Marie, Ont. 

The Beaver Log, .Miss Edgard's and .Miss Cramp's School, Inc., .Montreal. 

The Bishop Strachan School Magazine, Bishop Strachan School, Lonsdale Road, Toronto. 

Ont. 
Fi-Pa-Hi, Fisher Park High School, Ottawa. 
Latnpada, Lachute High School, Lachute, P.Q. 
The School Magazine, Sedbergh School, Montebello, P.Q. 
The Boar, Hillfield School, Hamilton, Ont. 
The Spotlight, Trenton High School, Trenton, Ont. 
The School Magazine, Selwyn House School, .Montreal. 
The Log, Royal Canadian Naval College, \^ictoria, B.C. 
The Cranbrookian, Cranbrook, Kent, England. 
Fer Annos, King's Hall, Compton, P.Q. 
Appleby Calling, Appleby College, Oakville, Ont. 
The Voyageur, Pickering College, Newmarket, Ont. 
The Peterite, St. Peter's, York, England. 
The Falcon, San Diego .Military Academy, California. 
Trafalgar Echoes, Trafalgar School, .Montreal. 

The Yardley Courtier, Yardley Court School, Tonbridge, Kent, England. 
St. Andreiv's College Revieu; St. Andrew's College, Aurora, Ont. 
The Shaii-nigan Lake School Magazine, Shawnigan Lake, B.C. 
Samara, Elmwood School, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
The R.M.C. Review, R..^LC., Kingston, Ont. 
The Record, Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 
The Queen's Review, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. 
The Patrician Herald, St. Patrick's College, Ottaw a. 
Northland Echoes, North Bay Collegiate, North Bay, Ont. 
The Eagle, St. Johns-Ravencourt School, Fort Garry, Alan. 
The Branksome Slogan, Branksonie Hall, Toronto, Ont. 
The Twig, University of Toronto Schools, Toronto, Ont. 
Hermes, Humberside Collegiate Institute, Toronto, Oni. 
The Old Decanian, Dean Close School, Cheltenham, England. 
The Gra^nniarian, Karachi Grammar School, Karachi, Pakistan. 




RlPII}tJKIP.lS1> 



We appreciate the opportunity of assisting the editor 
and his associates in the preparation of this book to 
the extent of providing the printing plates. 




a TV CENTRE omm 4 



C MURRAY CLEARY LTD. 



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Suite 500 — Kenson Bldg. 



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Allan Gill & Co. 
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Insurance Agents 
Robert J. Gill 



Suite 500 — Kenson Bldg. 
225 Metcalfe St. 



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Telephone: 232-5741 
393 Somerset St. West Ottawa 4, Ont. 



Morrison and Elvidge Ltd. 

TRAVEL AGENCY 

Agents for 

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222 Elgin Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Telephones 232-9663 

or 232-8843 



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Imported and Bottled by 

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Compliments of 

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RED LINE TAXIS 
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Custom Tailors and Outfitters to 
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143 Sparks St. Phone 232-0724 
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Compliments of 

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WINDOWS & DOORS 



G. H. Johnson's Furniture 

Limited 

282 Bank — near Somerset 
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For trade-in furniture, visit 

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111 Murray — largest in Ottawa 

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"When it's flowers, say it with ours" 

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Florist 

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KITCHENER, ONTARIO 



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Daily Services — Montreal — Toronto — Kingston — Nev 


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90 Sparks Street, 
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D. D. DiPLOCK, Q.C. 
W. L. Shortreed, Q.C. 



Cable Address: "Welcald" 



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J. G. Al. Hooper 
F. E. Gibson 

T. R. SWABEY 



Telephone: 233-5666 





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BIRKS & 


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101 Sparks St. 




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TOUCHE, ROSS, BAILEY & SMART 

Chartered Accountants 

HALIFAX SAINT JOHN CAP DE LA MADELEINE QUEBEC MONTREAL 

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90 Sparks Street 
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Compliments of 


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